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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 9:26 am 
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Seeing as we have such a nice international community here, I thought it would be cool if everyone gave their fellow forum denizens and Zappa fans some musical recommendations from their respective native countries. Any musical style goes...

And yes, US and UK residents are not excluded from participation, even though we already hear your stuff everyday.. :mrgreen:

I'm sure it's pretty much the same in every country: tons and tons of poo, but with lots of hidden musical diamonds as well. I think there was an older thread somewhere similar to this one, but I can't find it.

I'll add something later on.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 10:07 am 
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Since I hail from Estonia, it's inevitable to mention that the most famous composer to hail from our native country is Arvo Pärt. I'm wondering how many are familiar with his works?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arvo_P%C3%A4rt

To get considerably more obscure, I think you might want to check out this chap:

http://www.myspace.com/jakobjuhkam

Jakob Juhkam is a guy who is about the age of FeralCats (that is, 14-15 years old), and he makes progressive-rock inspired instrumental music, he plays all the instruments on this one. He cites Frank Zappa among his influences and Tommy Mars is apparently one of his fave keyboardists, although Jakob's synthesizer tones aren't as cheesy sounding as those of Mars. Quite a talented kid.

One guy i really admire is Pastacas. He's a one man electronic artist who blends electronics with vocals and some acoustic instrumentation such as guitars and flute. I saw him live and it was mindblowing what he did: he had a looper and he built up songs by adding layer upon layer, while switching between instruments: he sang, he played flute (and occasionally a bit of recorder) and bass guitar on top of some (drum) loops. Truly a phenomenal guy! No sound samples anywhere, but if you want, i can upload selections from his latest album from 2004 for you.

I play in a band myself as well:

http://www.myspace.com/opiumflirt

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 10:16 am 
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I guess I'll talk about some distinctly american composers that are modern and that not everyone may have heard of. All of these people are still alive and active. (Which I guess makes them 'Contemporary', not 'modern')

MIKEL ROUSE-
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I only have one album of his, 'Dennis Cleveland'. It's a very pop inflected opera that makes a clear cut away from the European tradition (for one, it's about a Talk show host a la Jerry Springer). The Rhythms are incredible, as he piles one complex rhythm on top of another while still remaining catchy and accessible. Great libretto too (Personal favorite quote- "All my life I'm been LOVELES (L-O-V-E-L-E-S)" "Leave the S off for savings!"

Kyle Gann-
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A composer/critic (which is one of the reasons he excels at both.) His work covers several stylistic grounds, some dealing in microtonality, some in complex Nancarrowy rhythms (Having written the only biography and scholarly tome on the man) Disklavier music (like the Player Piano, but digitally MIDI controlled) with also Electronic and Orchestral music. A sort of modern Charles Ives. His music is classy, accessible, and hopelessly complex.

La Monte Young (Oh, you've all heard of him)-
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A composer who birthed minimalism. Also, The Velvet Underground has major influence (Don't hold that against him, if you don't like them. They don't sound very similar.) His music is a sort of beautiful evolving soundworld in itself, frequently in just intonation. Most of his music can go on for hours, and keep you enthralled the entire time. Zappa professed to being a fan. Key Work- The Well Tuned Piano (If you can download his music, go ahead. It's mostly all out of print.)

I'd post more, but then I'd ramble. I tried to keep it obscure, accessible, and fantastic. If someone said, what are those composers in america doing..? I'd show them these 3, definatley.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:32 am 
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In the twentieth-century classical department, I'd advice Ruud Bos, Gilius van Bergeijk, Floris van Bergeijk, and the opera Reconstructie by Louis Andriessen, Ton de Leeuw, Peter Schat, Micha Mengelberg, and Jan van Vlijmen.
Earlier classical music, well, there's some cool stuff, but not much. Best known and well adviced are Fantasia Chromatica by Sweelinck and Concerti Armonici by Graaf Unico Wilhelm van Wassenaer.

For recent music I'd say Solex (Elizabeth Esselink) is pretty cool, a little Primus-y.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 1:01 pm 
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Quote:
Solex (Elizabeth Esselink)


...is completley awesome.
Your land is the best land in this thread.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 1:06 pm 
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FeralCats wrote:
Quote:
Solex (Elizabeth Esselink)


...is completley awesome.
Your land is the best land in this thread.


Yes!

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 2:08 pm 
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OK, some good music from my own country:


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:)

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 2:53 pm 
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I've to confess that I'm not very familiar with the music from my own country.

Besides Beethoven, Brahms, Bach, Wagner, Händel, Haydn, Orff and some other guys who already had a hit single in the charts I would recommend:

Can

http://www.spoonrecords.com/

Holger Czukay

http://www.czukay.de/

Ex-member of Can. Highly recommendable, I like his stuff much more than Can. A Stockhausen student with a taste for the bizarre. Btw he's the man in my avatar.

Neu !

http://www.michaelrother.de/de/

Element Of Crime

http://www.element-of-crime.de/

Great relaxed music with german lyrics.

Passport

http://www.klaus-doldinger.de/

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Last edited by My_Name_Is_Fritz on Wed Jan 31, 2007 3:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 3:02 pm 
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My favourite guitarist: Derek Bailey 8)

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 3:15 pm 
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My Name Is Fritz:

Ever heard of Cluster? I heartily recommend their albums like "Zuckerzeit" and "Sowiesoso" if you already haven't heard them. fantastic kraut-space-ambient music. real trippy and quirky stuff. but very beautiful and evocative.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 3:17 pm 
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Xhol Caravan live on...


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 3:53 pm 
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If you have a taste for intelligent punk rock at all (and very few Zappa fans do, unfortunately), listen to The Minutemen. Sure, they've been broken up for 20 years, but their music still gets constant play from me. Probably my all-time favorite American outfit apart from FZ.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minutemen_(band)
sorry, couldn't get the link to work.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 5:41 pm 
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For regular recommendations, please refer to the Brazilian Popular Music Mofos thread...

For guys with a taste for jazz, like Studebaker I definetively recommend some Toninho Horta:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=feSa_WMY6Kw

Interesting Toninho with Eddy Palermo, is it who I am thinking he is?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOKTDsr6nag


Also I love the sound of Paulo Moura (on sax with a guy playing the Berimbau, typical Brazilian roots percussion instrument)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdyn3j4kRao


On the classical field I recommend some well known composers like Villa-Lobos:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tp14jQae1ZI

There are some wild contemporary composers as well like Guerra-Peixe but few available vids...

On another note, is anybody here familiar with Moondog's music and is willing to tell me their impressions of it?

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 6:13 pm 
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feetlightup wrote:
The Minutemen

:)

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 7:20 pm 
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baddy wrote:
feetlightup wrote:
The Minutemen

:)


I second that! (third it?)


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 9:59 pm 
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 10:46 pm 
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most people around the world think about "mariachis" and "latin lover ballad singers" when my country is named,
but that's just the product of media merchadasing,
there are some really awsome musicians that i love

first my all time hero with an intro by AARON COPLAND:

a few years ago our knowledge of Mexican music was confined purely to popular folk music. It is only in the past three or four years that the public has become in any way conscious of the fact that there is a new musical movement in Mexico comparable in importance to the movement in painting. This new movement is due principally to the efforts of two composers, Carlos Chavez and Sylvestre Revueltas. Both Chavez and Revueltas are friends of the painters Rivera and Orozco. They understand that in order to created a purely indigenous movement in music they must find a musical background in their own country, just as the painters have found their roots in the Mexican landscape. In a sense, this is easier for Mexicans than for artists in our own country, because Mexico possesses a very strong folk art derived from its own Indian civilization, which provides the artist with a rich source material.

Chavez is a name known to most music lovers -- thanks to his recent conductorship of the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra. Revueltas deserves to be equally well known, because he has already produced music which makes him a figure of importance in the general scheme of the modern musical movement. In certain respects Revueltas is even more obviously the Mexican artist in his music than Chavez. He draws more directly on actual tunes that originated from popular Mexican music, and he composes organically tunes which are almost indistinguishable from the original folk material itself.

Revueltas is the type of inspired composer in the sense that Schubert was the inspired composer. That is to say, his music is a spontaneous outpouring, a strong expression of his inner emotions. There is nothing premeditated or unspontaneous about him. When seized with the creative urge, he has been known to spend days on end without food or sleep until the piece was finished. He writes his music at a table in the manner of the older musicians, and quite unlike the musical procedure of the modern composer, who, because he uses complex harmonies and rhythms, is as a rule forced to seek the help of the piano. I mention this as an instance of Revueltas's extraordinary musicality and naturalness.

His music is above all vibrant and colorful. It is characteristic of Revueltas that he does not write symphonies and sonatas so much as vivid tone pictures. His orchestral works are entitled "Street Corners," "Windows," "Maguey Plants," "Roads" -- suggestive titles which leave much to the imagination of the listener. One of his more recent orchestral works; which was privately recorded in Mexico, is called "The Frog Going Places." Many of these works leave one with an impression similar to that one receives from the bustling life of the typical Mexican fiesta. Revueltas takes his simple tunes (Mexican folk melodies are not distinguished by any great richness of variety) and uses them with all the elaborate paraphernalia available to the composer who is thoroughly aware of the modern movement in music.

Revueltas is a progressive soul in every sense of the word. A first hearing of his music is almost certain to bring to mind the image of Stravinsky or Bela Bartok, but a more intimate knowledge of the score makes more evident the special personality of the composer. Speaking broadly, I should say that Revueltas's music has been more quickly appreciated in Mexico than that of Chavez. This may be due to the fact that its content is less intellectual and therefore can be more easily understood. The music of Chavez is strong, stark and lacking in any exterior colorfulness; Revueltas's music, by comparison, is derived from the more usual everyday side of Mexican life. It is often highly spiced, like Mexican food itself. It is full of whims and sudden quirks of fancy and leaves one with a sense of the abundance and vitality of life.

The score that Revueltas has written for "The Wave," the Mexican film "Redes," now at the Filmarte, was composed in 1935 and has many of the qualities characteristic of Revueltas's art.

The need for musical accompaniments by serious composers is gradually becoming evident even to Hollywood. The Mexican Government, choosing Revueltas to supply the music for "The Wave," is very much like the U.S.S.R. asking Shostakovich to supply sound for its best pictures. It is questionable whether the real future of either of these men lies in the field of concert music.

Fortunately, in the case of the Mexican composer, we do not have to wait for the concert world to reveal him to us. Any one who is interested in the development of music in the Western Hemisphere is now able to hear the music that Revueltas has written for Paul Strand's memorable film about Mexico.


second:

What the 13th Sound is.

The 13th Sound, in the litteral meaning of the word, was that sound that broke the classic 12-tone scale, at one sixteenth of tone (those were the intervals I found in my [1895] experiment) between the pitches of G and A on the fourth violin string, and whose mathematical formula is 1.0072. But now, the 13th Sound is the word that names my whole Revolution that has conquisted in its development a multiplicity of musical intervals never before imagined; that has invented and built new musical intruments that has been performed in concerts in the most prestigious musical centers in Europe as well as in the Americas, and that has planned, besides, the total reformation of classical theories, both of music and musical physics; that has written the technical books for its development, invented a new musical notation, &c., &c.
Julián Carrillo

While experimenting with his violin in 1895, Julian Carrillo discovered the sixteenths of tone, i.e., sixteen clearly different sounds between the pitches of G and A emitted by the fourth violin string. Because there are six whole tones in conventional tuning to the next octave, a musical scale made with sixteenths of each tone has 96 different notes or pitches. In contrast to this, the scale made with half-tones has only 12 pitches.

On the basis of this discover, Carrillo proposed a radical change of the musical system.

The "Thirteenth Sound" revolution is an attempt to incorporate musical microintervals into the musical system, i.e., to compose music with microintervals. The number 13 is not a proposal to use a scale made with thirteen sounds, but a symbol of the break with the traditional twelve-pitch (chromatic) scale that has been the basis of Western musical system.

When a composer breaks with the twelve-pitch scale, he or she is in front of an infinity of tempered and non tempered scales for composition.

Julian Carrillo reformed theories of music and physics of music. He invented a surprisingly easy musical notation based on numbers that can represent scales based on any musical interval within the octave, like thirds, fourths, quarters, fifths, sixths, sevenths, and so on (even if Carrillo wrote, most of the time, for quarters, eights, and sixteenths combined, the notation is able to represent any imaginable subdivision). He invented, adapted, and made new musical instruments that can produce microintervals. He composed a large amount of microtonal music and recorded about 30 of his compositions.

Carrillo published his Theory of the Thirteenth Sound in the twenties years. It is therefore a contemporary of other microtonal musical proposals made by the Czech Alois Haba and the French-Russian Ivan Wishnegradsky. They all began to compose music in quarter of tones in the twenties and had to adapt musical instruments to produce those microintervals. But Carrillo's proposal (the Thirteenth Sound) was deeper, more radical and more comprehensive. While European musicians discussed the possibility of composing with thirds or quarters of tone, and some of them did the first timid attempts of composing with these intervals, Carrillo demonstrated the possibility of writing for sixteenth of tones.

The first conferences on, and demonstrations of, microtonal music occurred in 1924. Some early demonstrations were broadcast.

In February the 15th, 1925, the first Thirteenth Sound concert was performed, in the Teatro Principal (Principal Theater) of Mexico City. On December of that year, the Thirteenth Sound was presented in Havana - and the following March in New York City.

Julian Carrillo devoted his remaining life to consolidate his microtonal musical proposal, named "The Thirteenth Sound Revolution".

He composed about a hundred works. He lectured about music and acoustics in America and Europe. He taught his theories in the Escuela Nacional de Música (UNAM) and privately. He conducted and organized a Thirteenth Sound Orchestra in which all instruments were able to produce microintervals. He made microtonal instruments and wrote many books.

Some of his works are: Preludio a Colón (Prelude to Columbus for voice with chamber ensemble, 1922, first performed in 1924); Sonata casi fantasia for violin, violoncello and guitar in quarter-, eighth- and sixteenth-tones (1925); Concertino in quarter-, eighth- and sixteenth-tones for violin, cello and harp with orchestra (1926, commissioned by Leopold Stokowski who also commissioned the first of two Columbus Symphonies in quarter-, eighth- and sixteenth-tones, both 1926); Horizons: Symphonic Poem for violin and cello in quarter- and eighth-tones and harp in sixteenth-tones with orchestra (1947); two Concertos for violin and orchestra in quarter-tones (1949 and 1959); and Mass to Pope John XXIII for male voices a capella in quarter-tones ("Mass of Restoration", 1962).

Among the new instruments he made are fifteen "metamorphoser" pianos which produce scales from whole tones to sixteenths. These pianos won the Grand Gold Medal in the Universal Exposition of Brussels in 1958.

Julian Carrillo was nominated for the Nobel Prize on Physics in 1950 because of his work about the node law.

Most of his bibliography, including the musical magazine El Sonido 13 can be consulted in the Mexico's National Library (Centro Cultural Universitario, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City). His discography can be heard in the Fonoteca of Radio UNAM, organized by Juan Arturo Brenan. His music is published by Jobert in Paris.


and third just to have afew examples, my teacher and mentor
Julio Estrada:

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Born in Mexico City, 10th of April 1943. His family was exiled from Spain in 1941. His activities are multiple: composer, theoretician, historian, pedagogue, and interpreter.

He began his musical studies in Mexico [1953-65], where he studied composition with Julián Orbón. In Paris (1965-69) he studied with Nadia Boulanger, Messiaen and attended courses and lectures of Xenakis. In Germany he studied with Stockhausen [1968] and with Ligeti [1972] He did a Ph. D. in Musicology at Strasbourg University (1990- 1994).

Since 1974 he became researcher in music at the Instituto de Estéticas, IIE/UNAM, where he was apointed as the Chair of a project on Mexican Music History and as the head of MúSIIC, Música, Sistema Interactivo de Investigación y Composición, a musical system designed by himself. He is he first music scholar to be honored as member of the Science Academy of Mexico and by the Mexican Education Ministery as National Researcher [since 1984]. He created a Composition Seminar at UNAM, where he has been teaching Compositional Theory and Philosophy of Composition.

He has wrote about a hundred of articles based on his research. Some have been translated into English, French, German, Italian and Japanese. He is the General Editor of the must complete publication on mexican music history, La Música de México [Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, IIE / UNAM, México 1984, ca. 2000 p.] He wrote with Jorge Gil Musica y Teoria de Grupos Finitos, 3 Variables Booleanas, with an English abstract [IIE UNAM, Mexico 1984]. He has postulated a General Theory of Intervallic Classes, applicable to macro and microintervallic scales of duration and of pitch. In the field of the continuum Estrada has developed new methods of multidimensional graphic description of several parameters of sound or ryhthm. His research on the continuum field will be published in 1998 in France : Ouvrir l’horizon du son : le continuum.

He has been a visiting professor at Stanford, California, San Diego, New Mexico, Musikwissenschaft Institut, Rostock and at Darmstadt

His music is associated to compositional research on diverse domaines ; i.e. : scales, Suite, piano [1960]; improvisational processes: Persona, vocal trio [1969]; compositional mechanos, Memorias for a Keyboard [1971]; finite groups, Melódica, [1973], Canto mnémico [1973-83]; networks, Canto tejido, piano [1974], Canto alterno, cello [1978], Ensemble'yuunohui, strings [1983-90]; intervallic identities, Canto naciente, brass octet (1975-78]; continuum macro-timbre and sound spacialisation, eolo'oolin, six percussionists [1981-90]; new instrumental developments, Canto oculto, violin [1977] ; the four yuunohui ; continuum, eua'on ; multiparametric poliphony, the yuunohui (1983-90); topological continuum variations, ishini’ioni, string quartet [1984-90]; continuum-discontinuum modulation, yuunohui’tlapoa, harpsichord [1994-97]; Prehispanic ceremonial conception of music, opera Pedro Páramo : "Doloritas" (1992)

His works are mainly published by Editions Salabert, France. The French Ministery of Culture decorated him with the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (1981, 1986).

"The techniques and theories I have developed are based on mathematics and acoustics ; the more neutral they remain, the better they serve the description of the imaginary : it is my ear---there everything is allowed---that gives birth to my music, which becomes the accurate, almost phonographic representation, of every detail coming from my inner hearing experiences."

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2007 12:20 am 
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The only stuff i know from France is

Gotan Project -with a nice Chungas Revenge cover.
Marc Moulin - ElectroJazz
St-Germain - Electrojazz
Philippe Catherine-Great Guitarist

And of course anything by Serge Gainsbourg....

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2007 1:26 am 
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The_Acadian_2 wrote:
The only stuff i know from France is

Gotan Project -with a nice Chungas Revenge cover.
Marc Moulin - ElectroJazz
St-Germain - Electrojazz
Philippe Catherine-Great Guitarist

And of course anything by Serge Gainsbourg....

What about Zappe Zappa or LeBocal? Have you ever seen them live?

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2007 7:10 am 
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i talk for wales not the uk but i have no problem livin in uk.

budgie
man
alarm
uk subs
dave edmunds
andy fairweather-low
and tom the bomb jones

and thats about it...

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2007 7:37 am 
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FeralCats wrote:
MIKEL ROUSE-
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I only have one album of his, 'Dennis Cleveland'. It's a very pop inflected opera that makes a clear cut away from the European tradition (for one, it's about a Talk show host a la Jerry Springer). The Rhythms are incredible, as he piles one complex rhythm on top of another while still remaining catchy and accessible. Great libretto too (Personal favorite quote- "All my life I'm been LOVELES (L-O-V-E-L-E-S)" "Leave the S off for savings!"


Heh! We used to drink in the same dive bar on 9th Avenue. He would scribble in a notebook. He knew I was into music and so we never really spoke much beyond a nod & a hello. It was his hideout and I didn't want to bother him. Still have never heard his stuff...I figured he had the chance to pass me a complimentary cd...


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2007 7:43 am 
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FeralCats wrote:
Xhol Caravan live on...


Their ELECTRIP album from 1969 is a must-hear for MOI fans. VERY Motherly circa' Lowell George band.

I have some live things but I have mixed feelings about 'em. Time to review the collection, I guess. ANYWAY, what I really want to know, has anyone seen the fairly recently released DVD?

OH YEAH: My pick for great unsung american arteest: www.rsteviemoore.com


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brainpang wrote:
OH YEAH: My pick for great unsung american arteest: www.rsteviemoore.com


:!: I'm a huge fan!! R. Stevie is the man.

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Belle & Sebastian
Travis
Idlewild
Wet Wet Wet
Sensational Alex Harvey Band
Simple Minds
Teenage Fanclub
Bay City Rollers
Primal Scream
The Proclaimers
Texas
Mull historical society
Big country
Snow Patrol
Franz Ferdinand
Bis
Deacon Blue
Fish
Jesus and Mary Chain
Mogwai
Runrig
Trash Can Sinatras
Del Amitri
Orange Juice
Nazareth
Beta Band
Biffy Clyro
Altered Images
Aztec Camera
Eddi Reader
Goodbye Mr Mackenzie
Fire Engines
Delgados
Arab strap
Vaselines
Associates
The Pastels
Eurythmics
Blue Nile
Boards of Canada
Rezillos
Incredible string band
Cocteau twins
Dogs Die in Hot Cars
Spare Snare
Average White Band
Skids
Shamen
Hipsway
The Silencers
Hue and Cry
The Exploited


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2007 12:51 pm 
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The_Acadian_2 wrote:
The only stuff i know from France is

Gotan Project -with a nice Chungas Revenge cover.
Marc Moulin - ElectroJazz
St-Germain - Electrojazz
Philippe Catherine-Great Guitarist

And of course anything by Serge Gainsbourg....


St Germain are ok. I've got the 'Tourist' cd somewhere.


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