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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 3:14 pm 
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You're the hater, SPACEBROTHER forum entity. You hate anyone that disagrees with you.

Of course you paid attention in history class. That's why you are so misinformed.

I'm proud of my potsmoking hippie past, and my potsmoking rebel present. It shows I got balls, and I'm not a government dupe.

Meanwhile, SPACEBROTHER forum entity reflects the current state of much of the American population...frightened little sheep too scared to question government or the history they were taught in school.

You might not know how disappointed Hitler was when America joined in with the Allies. He thought, looking at history, that we would be all for genocide, because we are, so long as it is a people that has resources to steal.

By the way, did you see this?

http://therebel.org/index.php?option=co ... temid=1198

New scientific studies are proving that "conspiracy theorists" are sane, while goverment dupes are crazy and hostile.

Please, go on about Ft. Sumpter, government professor SPACEBROTHER forum entity.


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 4:02 pm 
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Ronny's Noomies wrote:
Disco Boy wrote:
Standing in front of a Confederate flag is un-American?! That comment right there is further proof that you're a fucking idiot. And while I know what you're implying and can understand why some people see it as racist, The Confederate flag is also considered by some as a symbol of southern heritage and the independence of the distinct cultural tradition of the South from the North.....! :roll:

This is the nicest interpretation of the meaning of the Confederate Flag I've ever seen. Yes, it's a symbol of southern heritage, but it's the kind of south that was built upon slavery. It's a symbol of the old racist south, and no one who cares about human rights would be caught dead associating with it. Over the years, it's symbolism has been distilled down to a powerful statement of longing for the old, white owned south. That's my opinion. But it's a pretty much accepted view all over the country. You're off base on this one DB.......


Wow , you were taught that ? :?

SPACEBROTHER wrote:
Slavery was legal in the USA for longer than it hasn't. Slavery still exists today with human trafficking and what not.


The first slaves were brought to the New World in 1501 by the Spaniards. The first person to own permanent black slaves in North America was a black man named Anthony Johnson. The United States came into existance when the Constitution was adopted in 1787. So slavery existed in North America for 286 years before the United States came into being. That's 61 years longer than the US has been around.
Within 80 years of the founding of the United States slavery was abolished. So, out of a total of 363 years of slavery in North America only 80 years, less than 1/4 of the time, occurred in the United States.


Think I'll step over to the hippie area over there , smoke some pot and maybe get my head around how this country has transformed into one of the most brainwashed one in the world. And to think , I was raised to fear those communists . :roll:

That's the good ole propaganda machine at work , huh guys ? :lol:


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 4:11 pm 
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Ronny's Noomies wrote:
Disco Boy wrote:
No, I'm not off base at all. I basically stated that it symbolically represents TWO different things for TWO different types of Southerners. And it DOES, regardless of whether or not Lefties like yourself who only seem to view it from one angle agree....

You can calm down DB, I'm not looking for a fight here, and I'm not entering your fight with SB either. The confederate flag, to my knowledge, initially flew in the south as confederate soldiers fought like hell to keep slavery alive. It has morphed over time to be a fuzzy symbol of current and past southern culture, in addition to the obviously racist message it sends to, minimally, just about every black American north or south, as well as a hell of a lot of white people. It's a racist symbol.

That's all I have.


No, it's a racist symbol to SOME people.

tweedle-dumb wrote:
BLAH...BLAH...BLAH...BLAH...BLAH...The issue is that Ron and Rand Paul are racists and the people they surround themselves with are racists...BLAH...BLAH...BLAH...BLAH...BLAH...


PROVE IT...or

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAgRBq2jnz4

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"...I'm absolutely a Libertarian on MANY issues..." ~ Frank Zappa, Rochester, NY, March 11, 1988


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 4:47 pm 
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Religious and Free-Market Fundamentalism Have More in Common Than Their Fans in the Tea Party
21 July 2012


The Republican Party has adopted increasingly hard-line stances on economic issues in recent years. Moderate Republicans have declined both in number and in influence as the party has made a point of categorically opposing the Obama administration's rather centrist economic agenda. This obstructionism not only reflects the Republicans' avowed priority to make Obama "a one-term president," but also an ideology that has received insufficient attention: free-market fundamentalism. This ideology rests on the notion that the economy can fairly provide for everyone's well being without government regulation or stewardship. It fosters the conviction that "big government" regulation, and taxes are the causes of nearly all economic problems.

The term "fundamentalism" originates from essays called "The Fundamentals," which were published in the 1910s in an effort to defend traditional Christianity against modern and liberal influences. "Fundamentalism" eventually came to describe hard-line forms of religion, as well as ideologies sharing comparable traits. Like religious fundamentalism, free-market fundamentalism emphasizes the need for ideological purity, thereby leading people to embrace extreme positions and uncompromisingly oppose government economic intervention.

Because fundamentalists are ideologically driven, they tend to reject basic facts that do not comport with their ideology. Religious fundamentalists have unyielding faith in the literal veracity of the Bible and consequently dispute all conflicting science, such as the theory of evolution. By the same token, free-market fundamentalists dispute basic facts that call into question the efficiency and fairness of strict laissez-faire economics. For instance, market fundamentalists have led the Republican Party to oppose increasing financial regulation as a matter of principle, even following the catastrophic 2008 financial crisis and the ensuing Great Recession. Insisting that the market can adequately regulate itself, few Republicans have recognized that the crisis was primarily caused by Wall Street's reckless practices, which had been facilitated by financial deregulation.

Since the fundamentalists' extreme views usually do not square with the facts, they commonly proceed to make up their own facts, resorting to disinformation and conspiracy theories.
As such, religious fundamentalists have claimed that the theory of evolution is a "fraud," that there is no consensus in the scientific community about its validity, and that creationism is accepted by many scientists. Free-market fundamentalists have likewise resorted to glaring misrepresentations in order to defend their ideology. Partisans of deregulation have notably challenged the Obama administration's health care reform by claiming that America provides better and cheaper access to medical treatment than nations with universal health care, whose systems are less market-driven and more regulated. These arguments have heavily shaped opposition to "Obamacare," plausibly even more than claims about its unconstitutionality, which the Supreme Court has now largely rejected, albeit by a narrow majority.

In fact, countries with universal health care have significantly lower medical costs than the United States and generally better health levels. At the time of the 2010 reform, 50 million Americans lacked medical insurance and many others were severely underinsured - a singularity in the developed world. While fundamentalists are adamant that an unregulated market efficiently provides for everyone's health care, the opposite is true. America is the only developed country allowing insurance companies to profit from basic health coverage. Until the Democratic reform, it was also the only one that let insurance companies deny coverage to people with "pre-existing medical conditions," such as cardiac problems or lupus. Proponents of unregulated markets have ignored these facts while advancing a host of canards about "socialized medicine," in the image of Sarah Palin's "death panels" conspiracy theory or Mike Huckabee's claim that Obama had "suggested that seniors who don't have as long to live might want to just consider taking a pain pill instead of getting an expensive operation."

Indifference toward the plight of the uninsured illustrates another salient feature of fundamentalism: obliviousness towards the social costs of ideological purity. This trait is not merely reflected by attitudes towards health care. Free-market fundamentalists are unfazed by the fact that wealth inequality has soared in recent decades, largely due to laissez-faire economic policies. The poor, working class and middle class have struggled while the richest of the rich have profited immensely. Market fundamentalists have additionally sought to expunge environmental regulations regardless of the consequences. In any event, most reject the science of global warming. Certain market fundamentalists, especially Tea Party activists, have recklessly insisted that a default on America's national debt payments would be preferable to raising the debt ceiling. Some have precipitated other serious crises, maintaining that they would rather have the federal government partially shut down than have it operate with a budget not encompassing drastic spending cuts on public services and sweeping tax cuts that would chiefly benefit the wealthy.

Religious fundamentalists have displayed an equivalent indifference to the social costs of their purist ideology. Due to their conviction that pre-marital sex is a grave sin, they have promoted abstinence-only sexual education while seeking to limit or repeal access to abortion and contraception. These policies demonstrably lead to more unwanted pregnancies and unplanned parenthood, including by teenagers. Efforts to hinder contraception lead to more abortions as well.

Religious fundamentalism and free-market fundamentalism do not merely parallel each other. These two narrow, far-right ideologies often overlap. Contemporary American Christian fundamentalists typically hold staunchly conservative views on economic issues. In the words of Sen. Jim DeMint (R-South Carolina), "You can't be a fiscal conservative and not be a social conservative." The Tea Party movement is primarily known for its strident denunciation of "big government," but many of its activists have likewise condemned abortion and gay rights in the name of religion. Next to being a Republican, the strongest predictor of being a Tea Party supporter is expecting religion to play a prominent role in politics, according to a recent study.

There has not always been a relationship between religious fundamentalism and free-market fundamentalism. William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925), the three-time Democratic presidential candidate, is usually remembered for his condemnation of evolution in the Scopes "Monkey Trial." But he also had a far more progressive economic agenda than most of his contemporaries. As Andrew Koppelman, a law professor, has underlined, Bryan "was an early proponent of women's suffrage, railroad regulation, the federal income tax, opposition to capital punishment, a federal department of labor, campaign fund disclosure, state initiative and referendum, and vigorous enforcement of antitrust law."

Nevertheless, the relationship between narrow, far-right attitudes towards religion and the economy is palpable in the modern-day Republican Party. Religious fundamentalism and market fundamentalism are both rigidly rooted in dogmatic faith - in the literal truth of scripture and in strict laissez-faire economics. These mindsets stand in sharp contrast to an evidence-based, pragmatic approach to religion and public policy.

Free-market fundamentalism goes far beyond the austerity measures promoted by European conservatives aiming to solve the region's current economic crisis. Unlike the contemporary Republican Party, leading European right-wing parties support a measure of social solidarity and sensible regulation. They notably embrace universal health care and are amenable to financial regulation. Conversely, market fundamentalism has led the contemporary Republican Party to reject all egalitarian considerations and steadfastly oppose regulation. This rigid mindset has not simply fostered irreconcilable differences with the Democratic Party, but has also placed the Republican Party at the extreme right in the modern Western world.

Free-market fundamentalism is a utopian ideology aiming to create an ideal society
with virtually no government economic oversight. Because fundamentalists are inherently hostile to compromise, they see no common ground with the Obama administration, which helps explain why they have systematically rejected pragmatic measures needed to tackle America's current economic and social problems.

By Mugambi Jouet


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2013 6:30 pm 
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More on Mugambi Jouet here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mugambi_Jouet


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 1:31 am 
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Since the fundamentalists' extreme views usually do not square with the facts, they commonly proceed to make up their own facts, resorting to disinformation and conspiracy theories.


BINGO!


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 4:35 am 
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SPACEBROTHER wrote:
Quote:
Since the fundamentalists' extreme views usually do not square with the facts, they commonly proceed to make up their own facts, resorting to disinformation and conspiracy theories.

BINGO!



Yep , facts like this >

SPACEBROTHER wrote:
Slavery was legal in the USA for longer than it hasn't.



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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 1:02 pm 
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Image


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 3:48 pm 
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pedro2 wrote:
The first slaves were brought to the New World in 1501 by the Spaniards. The first person to own permanent black slaves in North America was a black man named Anthony Johnson. The United States came into existance when the Constitution was adopted in 1787. So slavery existed in North America for 286 years before the United States came into being. That's 61 years longer than the US has been around.
Within 80 years of the founding of the United States slavery was abolished. So, out of a total of 363 years of slavery in North America only 80 years, less than 1/4 of the time, occurred in the United States.


Think I'll step over to the hippie area over there , smoke some pot and maybe get my head around how this country has transformed into one of the most brainwashed one in the world. And to think , I was raised to fear those communists . :roll:


Lincoln was a Communist? :? :roll:

pedro2 wrote:
SPACEBROTHER wrote:
Quote:
Since the fundamentalists' extreme views usually do not square with the facts, they commonly proceed to make up their own facts, resorting to disinformation and conspiracy theories.

BINGO!



Yep , facts like this >

SPACEBROTHER wrote:
Slavery was legal in the USA for longer than it hasn't.



So according to you, the 286 years that preceded the signing of a the DOI doesn't count regarding slavery in addition to the time between 1787 - 1865? :roll: Are you really that pathetic of an apologist for racism? :roll:


Same old Yes we Klan. :roll:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raEex1yAW7w


Should I have expected any less? :roll: Oh wait, you might threaten to shoot me again if I come to a few places in your town. :roll:


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 4:30 pm 
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It was not offically the United States of America until what, 1787, when the Constitution was adopted? SPACEBROTHER forum entity clearly says "USA" in the quote. It wasn't, it was colonies of Europeans, so the statement that slavery has been part of USA history longer than it has not is CLEARLY false.

Then, SPACEBROTHER forum entity goes on to call pedro a racist apologist for slavery.

No forum member should have to take that shit. You said something stupid SPACEBROTHER forum entity...admit and apologize.

It would do you good.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 8:37 pm 
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phydeaux3 wrote:
Religious and Free-Market Fundamentalism Have More in Common Than Their Fans in the Tea Party
21 July 2012


The Republican Party has adopted increasingly hard-line stances on economic issues in recent years. Moderate Republicans have declined both in number and in influence as the party has made a point of categorically opposing the Obama administration's rather centrist economic agenda. This obstructionism not only reflects the Republicans' avowed priority to make Obama "a one-term president," but also an ideology that has received insufficient attention: free-market fundamentalism. This ideology rests on the notion that the economy can fairly provide for everyone's well being without government regulation or stewardship. It fosters the conviction that "big government" regulation, and taxes are the causes of nearly all economic problems.

The term "fundamentalism" originates from essays called "The Fundamentals," which were published in the 1910s in an effort to defend traditional Christianity against modern and liberal influences. "Fundamentalism" eventually came to describe hard-line forms of religion, as well as ideologies sharing comparable traits. Like religious fundamentalism, free-market fundamentalism emphasizes the need for ideological purity, thereby leading people to embrace extreme positions and uncompromisingly oppose government economic intervention.

Because fundamentalists are ideologically driven, they tend to reject basic facts that do not comport with their ideology. Religious fundamentalists have unyielding faith in the literal veracity of the Bible and consequently dispute all conflicting science, such as the theory of evolution. By the same token, free-market fundamentalists dispute basic facts that call into question the efficiency and fairness of strict laissez-faire economics. For instance, market fundamentalists have led the Republican Party to oppose increasing financial regulation as a matter of principle, even following the catastrophic 2008 financial crisis and the ensuing Great Recession. Insisting that the market can adequately regulate itself, few Republicans have recognized that the crisis was primarily caused by Wall Street's reckless practices, which had been facilitated by financial deregulation.

Since the fundamentalists' extreme views usually do not square with the facts, they commonly proceed to make up their own facts, resorting to disinformation and conspiracy theories.
As such, religious fundamentalists have claimed that the theory of evolution is a "fraud," that there is no consensus in the scientific community about its validity, and that creationism is accepted by many scientists. Free-market fundamentalists have likewise resorted to glaring misrepresentations in order to defend their ideology. Partisans of deregulation have notably challenged the Obama administration's health care reform by claiming that America provides better and cheaper access to medical treatment than nations with universal health care, whose systems are less market-driven and more regulated. These arguments have heavily shaped opposition to "Obamacare," plausibly even more than claims about its unconstitutionality, which the Supreme Court has now largely rejected, albeit by a narrow majority.

In fact, countries with universal health care have significantly lower medical costs than the United States and generally better health levels. At the time of the 2010 reform, 50 million Americans lacked medical insurance and many others were severely underinsured - a singularity in the developed world. While fundamentalists are adamant that an unregulated market efficiently provides for everyone's health care, the opposite is true. America is the only developed country allowing insurance companies to profit from basic health coverage. Until the Democratic reform, it was also the only one that let insurance companies deny coverage to people with "pre-existing medical conditions," such as cardiac problems or lupus. Proponents of unregulated markets have ignored these facts while advancing a host of canards about "socialized medicine," in the image of Sarah Palin's "death panels" conspiracy theory or Mike Huckabee's claim that Obama had "suggested that seniors who don't have as long to live might want to just consider taking a pain pill instead of getting an expensive operation."

Indifference toward the plight of the uninsured illustrates another salient feature of fundamentalism: obliviousness towards the social costs of ideological purity. This trait is not merely reflected by attitudes towards health care. Free-market fundamentalists are unfazed by the fact that wealth inequality has soared in recent decades, largely due to laissez-faire economic policies. The poor, working class and middle class have struggled while the richest of the rich have profited immensely. Market fundamentalists have additionally sought to expunge environmental regulations regardless of the consequences. In any event, most reject the science of global warming. Certain market fundamentalists, especially Tea Party activists, have recklessly insisted that a default on America's national debt payments would be preferable to raising the debt ceiling. Some have precipitated other serious crises, maintaining that they would rather have the federal government partially shut down than have it operate with a budget not encompassing drastic spending cuts on public services and sweeping tax cuts that would chiefly benefit the wealthy.

Religious fundamentalists have displayed an equivalent indifference to the social costs of their purist ideology. Due to their conviction that pre-marital sex is a grave sin, they have promoted abstinence-only sexual education while seeking to limit or repeal access to abortion and contraception. These policies demonstrably lead to more unwanted pregnancies and unplanned parenthood, including by teenagers. Efforts to hinder contraception lead to more abortions as well.

Religious fundamentalism and free-market fundamentalism do not merely parallel each other. These two narrow, far-right ideologies often overlap. Contemporary American Christian fundamentalists typically hold staunchly conservative views on economic issues. In the words of Sen. Jim DeMint (R-South Carolina), "You can't be a fiscal conservative and not be a social conservative." The Tea Party movement is primarily known for its strident denunciation of "big government," but many of its activists have likewise condemned abortion and gay rights in the name of religion. Next to being a Republican, the strongest predictor of being a Tea Party supporter is expecting religion to play a prominent role in politics, according to a recent study.

There has not always been a relationship between religious fundamentalism and free-market fundamentalism. William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925), the three-time Democratic presidential candidate, is usually remembered for his condemnation of evolution in the Scopes "Monkey Trial." But he also had a far more progressive economic agenda than most of his contemporaries. As Andrew Koppelman, a law professor, has underlined, Bryan "was an early proponent of women's suffrage, railroad regulation, the federal income tax, opposition to capital punishment, a federal department of labor, campaign fund disclosure, state initiative and referendum, and vigorous enforcement of antitrust law."

Nevertheless, the relationship between narrow, far-right attitudes towards religion and the economy is palpable in the modern-day Republican Party. Religious fundamentalism and market fundamentalism are both rigidly rooted in dogmatic faith - in the literal truth of scripture and in strict laissez-faire economics. These mindsets stand in sharp contrast to an evidence-based, pragmatic approach to religion and public policy.

Free-market fundamentalism goes far beyond the austerity measures promoted by European conservatives aiming to solve the region's current economic crisis. Unlike the contemporary Republican Party, leading European right-wing parties support a measure of social solidarity and sensible regulation. They notably embrace universal health care and are amenable to financial regulation. Conversely, market fundamentalism has led the contemporary Republican Party to reject all egalitarian considerations and steadfastly oppose regulation. This rigid mindset has not simply fostered irreconcilable differences with the Democratic Party, but has also placed the Republican Party at the extreme right in the modern Western world.

Free-market fundamentalism is a utopian ideology aiming to create an ideal society
with virtually no government economic oversight. Because fundamentalists are inherently hostile to compromise, they see no common ground with the Obama administration, which helps explain why they have systematically rejected pragmatic measures needed to tackle America's current economic and social problems.

By Mugambi Jouet


http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Editorial

ed·i·to·ri·al (d-tôr-l, -tr-)
n.
1. An article in a publication expressing the opinion of its editors or publishers.
2. A commentary on television or radio expressing the opinion of the station or network.
adj.
1. Of or relating to an editor or editing: an editorial position with a publishing company; an editorial policy prohibiting the use of unnamed sources.
2. Of or resembling an editorial, especially in expressing an opinion: an editorial comment.
edi·tori·al·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
editorial [ˌɛdɪˈtɔːrɪəl]
adj
1. (Communication Arts / Journalism & Publishing) of or relating to editing or editors
2. (Communication Arts / Journalism & Publishing) of, relating to, or expressed in an editorial
3. (Communication Arts / Journalism & Publishing) of or relating to the content of a publication rather than its commercial aspects
n
(Communication Arts / Journalism & Publishing) an article in a newspaper, etc., expressing the opinion of the editor or the publishers
editorialist n
editorially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003
ed•i•to•ri•al (ˌɛd ɪˈtɔr i əl, -ˈtoʊr-)

n.
1. an article in a newspaper or other periodical presenting the opinion of the publishers or editors.
2. a statement resembling this, as one broadcast on radio presenting the opinion of the station owners or managers.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to an editor or editing.
4. of, pertaining to, or resembling an editorial.
[1735–45]
ed`i•to′ri•al•ist, n.
ed`i•to′ri•al•ly, adv.

_________________
:53 - :57...

"...I'm absolutely a Libertarian on MANY issues..." ~ Frank Zappa, Rochester, NY, March 11, 1988


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 14, 2013 8:53 pm 
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Quote:
pedro2 : Yep , facts like this >


FACTS .... history according to Oracle/Leash:


Quote:
Caputh
Post subject: Re: Fighting Obama wars? What the fuck is wrong with you?
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2012 6:51 am

Quote:
A rope leash wrote:

You know, Hitler was Time magazine's Man of the Year in 1939. Why? Because he took a broken country and made it prosper. He went a little nutso after that, but it's all "history" now.


Call me a Soviet if you will ( :wink:) but...
I think Hitler was made man of the year in 1938 as a result of the Munich Conference (remember Chamberlain and "his peace in our time" speech?) Weirdly enough, Stalin won in 1939 (the Nazi-Soviet pact) and in 1942 (Second year of Barbarossa). As to making Germany prosper during that period, he was preparing for war, running up massive state debt to finance rearmament and public works programmes with a military background, which ultimately made his declaration of war an economic necessity. He also passed numerous antisemitic laws, excluding Jews in both public and private law, instituted Reichskistallnacht (the first pogrom in around 200 years in Germany), imprisoned all political opposition in concentration camps, killed many members of his own party that he thought proved dangerous to his position and was the head of a corrupt and ultimately utterly Byzantine, corrupt government. I understand the irony of the word "nutso", but I think if one must use it, it definitely applies to Hitler before 1939 (or 1938). In any case, Time's depiction of Hitler as man of the year, with the background of Reichskristallnacht in that year, could be compared to the possibility of giving Assad the same title in 2012 i.e. pretty dumb, even with the knowledge that people had at the time.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 12:08 pm 
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I find it odd when people defend Hitler and Fascism on behalf of Free Markets. :roll:


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 15, 2013 12:54 pm 
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Hitler was an evil ass, but his people loved him. Why? Because he brought back the German economy from dismal lows. This, in my view, is one of the reasons he was on the cover of Time.

He also printed his own money, based on the value of labor. The international bankers did not like that at all.

I'm not defending him, I'm just pointing out the history that is left out of Western textbooks.


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 9:29 pm 
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SCANDAL! Rand Paul MUST return Neo-Nazi funds NOW and DENOUNCE Stormfront.org

This must be seen across America. Stormfront.org, which was founded to support David Duke for senate by another KKK Grand Dragon, Don Black, has been promoting and contributing to Rand Paul's moneybombs.

http://discuss.epluribusmedia.net/conte ... rmfrontorg


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PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 10:26 pm 
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tweedle-dumb wrote:
SCANDAL! Rand Paul MUST return Neo-Nazi funds NOW and DENOUNCE Stormfront.org

This must be seen across America. Stormfront.org, which was founded to support David Duke for senate by another KKK Grand Dragon, Don Black, has been promoting and contributing to Rand Paul's moneybombs.

http://discuss.epluribusmedia.net/conte ... rmfrontorg


viewtopic.php?f=10&t=19887

It's time to re-read the thread again, asshole. Because the above has been thoroughly debunked...

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"...I'm absolutely a Libertarian on MANY issues..." ~ Frank Zappa, Rochester, NY, March 11, 1988


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 28, 2013 12:11 am 
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Rand Paul and his fellow klansmen are at it again...

Rand Paul's paleo problem

The Kentucky senator recently hit some turbulence when the Washington Free Beacon reported that Jack Hunter, Mr. Paul's aide and the coauthor of his book, "The Tea Party Goes to Washington," was once the Southern Avenger.

Who's that? Starting in the 1990s, as a radio shock jock, Mr. Hunter would wear a wrestling mask made from a Confederate flag, while making jokes about the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and having the South re-secede.

"Although Lincoln's assassin John Wilkes Booth's heart was in the right place, the Southern Avenger does regret that Lincoln's murder ... turned him into a martyr," Mr. Turner said in 2004. Maybe the humor is all in the delivery?

Mr. Hunter's defenders, including my Fox News colleague, Andrew Napolitano, think the reaction against Mr. Hunter has been cranked up by neocon "hawks, whose ideology is ... being discredited every day." According to Mr. Napolitano, "Jack's sin in their eyes was having spoken favorably of states' rights, and negatively of Lincoln."

"Negatively of Lincoln" is a curious understatement, given that Mr. Hunter -- who admits to giving a "personal toast" to Booth on his birthday -- once suggested Lincoln would have had an amorous relationship with Adolf Hitler...

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2013-0 ... am-Lincoln



Like father like son. :P


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2013 8:48 am 
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Hey, Baddy's back! Time for a 'lil bump...

Rand And Ron Paul Hide Racism In Libertarianism | Breaking News for Black America

Despite its nefarious history, Ron Paul has been a longtime supporter and friend of the John Birch Society, speaking as they keynote speaker at their 50th anniversary and holding rallies with them. Like The John Birch society, Paul has become a magnet for Neo-Nazis who support him online on sites like Stormfront. Paul even has a picture with the Internets most notorious Neo-Nazis, Don Black and his son Derrek, the founders of Stormfront. Paul also famously refused to give back a donation from Don Black.

I’d be interested in hearing if Rand Paul agrees with his father that the Civil War shouldn’t have been fought and that the north was wrong for invading the South. Another seemingly racist position, that Ron Paul defends with libertarian “states rights” ideologies.

What Ron Paul and Rand Paul do is provide an intellectual cover and defense for blatant racism. This, along with Ron Paul’s history of promoting racism through his newsletters, is why they receive so much support from white supremacists. The two driving forces for the Paul’s political philosophy, the Ludwig Von Mises Institute and the John Birch society both serve as intellectual fronts for racism. The Ludwig Von Mises society is labeled a Neo-Confederate organization by the Southern Poverty Law Center for its support of the South in the Civil War and criticisms of Abraham Lincoln and the John Birch society is famous for producing people who go on to be Neo-Nazi leaders such as Revilo P. Oliver, Tom Metzger, William Pierce, and Kevin Strom.


http://aboriginalpress.wordpress.com/20 ... k-america/


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 08, 2013 3:41 am 
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Ron Paul fans rejoice - soon you'll be able to watch him 24 hours a day!
http://www.ronpaulchannel.com/landing/r ... n-preview/

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"Secluded from mankind by his exalted dignity, the truth is concealed from his knowledge; he can see only with their eyes, he hears nothing but their misrepresentations."


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2013 1:17 pm 
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Caputh wrote:
Ron Paul fans rejoice - soon you'll be able to watch him 24 hours a day!
http://www.ronpaulchannel.com/landing/r ... n-preview/

Nice.

He mentioned MAINSTREAM media...this is the first I've heard of it, I friggin HOPE it's on cable...lol, won't the elite be in for a shock...informed sheep, lol, "totally new concept!"

Thanks Cap :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 09, 2013 10:28 pm 
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I hear his new show will be on C-KLAN...

Image

Image

...and if by INFORMED, learning more about his direct ties to white supremacist groups and Peter Theil, the guy behind the NSA's spying on American citizens program and top campaign funder and consultant...

http://www.occupycorporatism.com/meet-p ... -movement/

http://exiledonline.com/ron-pauls-super ... -suffrage/


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 10, 2013 6:44 am 
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Also...

There's a different video on the straight url:

http://www.ronpaulchannel.com
___________________________


And this text from an email this morning...

Here's some news you'll never see on your TV: together, we're about to create a media revolution.

We're launching The Ron Paul Channel -- a media network dedicated to pursuing and reporting on the truth, fostering meaningful conversations, and celebrating the values that you and I agree must be restored in order to restore our great republic.

Let me show you an exclusive look at the set of the Ron Paul Channel. Watch this short video, then sign up to be the first to know when we launch.

http://links.spn.mkt5945.com/ctt?kn=4&m ... &mt=1&rt=0

The mainstream media and big government have chipped away at our freedom of speech and the press. Meanwhile our government is more secretive than ever. The NSA and IRS have crossed the line into our personal lives that the Founding Fathers could never have anticipated.

Forcing transparency, providing accurate and timely reporting, and sharing analysis about what's actually going on! There are some in mainstream media who have been asleep at the switch. So we are taking on the challenge, because you deserve the truth.

The Ron Paul Channel will be a platform for the uncensored, and sometimes ugly, truth that you won't see anywhere else. We'll feature the boldest, most fearless patriots and bring you the news and information everyone else is afraid to cover. We won't play favorites. We will invite guests who have differing points of view and here's an idea—we will engage in an honest conversation, or even debate, about the issues. We won't be influenced by advertisers, and we won't be censored. The Ron Paul Channel will be OUR channel! And the channel for the Truth.

If I know anything about the commitment of so many supporters of liberty like you, it's this:

Together we'll change more than just the information people get about the world around them -- we'll change the future of the country we love so much.

I sincerely hope all of you will join me in this patriotic experiment to change the media landscape.

Watch my video and sign up so you don't miss the full launch of the Ron Paul Channel:

http://www.ronpaulchannel.com/preview


Sincerely,
Dr. Ron Paul

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:04 am 
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Did somebody mention Ron Paul and the NSA? :lol:

SPACEBROTHER wrote:
Peter Thiel Is Ron Paul's Billionaire Sugar Daddy

Ron Paul may have an army of small donors but when it comes to billionaire sugar daddies, PayPal co-founder and early Facebook investor Peter Thiel is the financial stalwart of the campaign. According to campaign finance documents filed with the FEC on Monday, Thiel donated $1.7 million to Ron Paul-supporting super PAC Endorse Liberty in January, which amounted to over 70 percent of the $2.4 million it received for the month. Following donations of $150,000 and $750,000 donations made in December, the billionaire has given the PAC $2.6 million, accounting for 76 percent of its total fundraising.

http://www.theatlanticwire.com/politics ... ddy/48933/


Is This Creepy Facebook-Friendly Startup Behind the NSA PRISM Program?

Palantir says it sells "software that allows organizations to make sense of massive amounts of disparate data," for purposes including "combating terrorism," and offers to bring "Silicon Valley to your doorstep." It's enjoyed early investments from the CIA, which might have something to do with its current napkin-valuation of around $5 billion, and now employs former top spooks like Michael Leiter. Palantir also happens to sell software called "Prism," which shares its namesake with an NSA spy program that also aims to bring Silicon Valley to snoop doorsteps around the Beltway. Palantir's Prism, according to a handy user manual published on TPM, "is a software component that lets you quickly integrate external databases"—exactly the kind of action that the NSA allegedly makes use of to suck up your Facebook browsing, Gmail inbox, and Google searches in realtime...

...Facebook was once a neighbor—directly across the street—of Palantir, at 156 University Avenue in Palo Alto. Peter Thiel, who sits on Facebook's board of directors and has mentored Mark Zuckerberg for close to a decade, is a co-founder of Palantir—though that detail is omitted from his bio on the board's website. Sean Parker, Facebook's notorious first president and another earlier investor, created the VC firm Founder's Fund along with Thiel—and yes, it invests in Palantir. As Facebook has spread into the brains of a billion users and completely saturated the United States, it's become one of the NSA's top targets via PRISM: Federal spies have “continued exponential growth in [surveillance] tasking to Facebook," says the Washington Post, and federal intel analysts enjoy "extensive search and surveillance capabilities against the variety of online social networking services.”...

http://valleywag.gawker.com/is-this-cre ... -511895177




Ron pauls single biggest donor and go to money guy is direstly tied to giving data to the NSA.



Some further reading about Ron Pauls primary donors direct ties to the NSA. -------> http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125200842406984303.html


SPACEBROTHER wrote:
Peter Theil, primary Ron Paul money man, is directly implicated with handing your personal data to the NSA -------->


Palantir Technologies

Palantir was founded in 2004 by Peter Thiel, Alex Karp, Joe Lonsdale, Stephen Cohen, and Nathan Gettings. Early investments came in the form of $2 million from the CIA’s venture arm In-Q-Tel and $30 million from Thiel and his firm, The Founders Fund… Palantir’s name comes from the "seeing stones" in the Lord of the Rings.

Palantir was built through collaboration between computer scientists and analysts from intelligence agencies over three years, through pilots facilitated by In-Q-Tel. The software concept grew out of technology developed at PayPal to detect fraudulent activity, much of it conducted by Russian organized crime syndicates. The team realized that computers alone (Artificial Intelligence) could not defeat an adaptive adversary. Palantir allows human analysts to explore data from many sources.(Intelligence Augmentation)…

http://sweetness-light.com/archive/pris ... care-fraud


Big Data’: Bilderberg Firm Palantir Works for NSA Spy Agenda

“Paypal Mafia Don” Peter Thiel brings technocratic control of “big data” to the forefront of Bilderberg’s 2013 agenda via Silicon Valley’s partnership with the NSA and CIA.

The age of “big data” is reluctantly upon us, and it affects almost everything, as Bilderberg’s 2013 talking point suggests. Their secretive closed door discussion on massive stores of data, collected from the biggest portals on the Internet and analyzed in the pursuit of NSA objectives, is being led by Dr. Alexander Karp, the co-founder of Palantir Technologies.

The firm has admittedly been set-up with $2 million in seed money from In-Q-Tel, the private funding arm of the CIA, and the aid of Peter Thiel, Silicon Valley’s so-called “PayPal Mafia” Don who helps direct Bilderberg’s agenda and invitees as a member of its Steering Committee. Nart Villeneuve from Information Warfare Monitor, former Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff – responsible for bringing full body scanners to airports – and former chess world champion Garry Kasparov, also a Bilderberg attendee, have all been invited to speak at Palantir discussions dubbed “Palantir Night Live.”

http://wchildblog.com/2013/06/10/big-da ... py-agenda/


Is This Mysterious Silicon Valley Company Helping The NSA Spy On Americans?

...Palantir (which, at time of writing, had not responded to requests for comment) was founded in 2004 by, among others, venture capitalist Peter Thiel and CEO Alex Karp. It's a sort of second-party data intelligence company--it's not a public company, but it was founded with early investment from the CIA and is heavily used by the military and the White House.

http://www.popsci.com/technology/articl ... -americans



Stay tuned. Much much more to come... :lol:


SPACEBROTHER wrote:
What’s The Connection: Peter Thiel, Ron Paul, and the Bilderberg Group

Peter Thiel, the billionaire and co-founder of PayPal recently donated 2.5 million dollars to a superPAC that backs presidential candidate Ron Paul. The interesting thing here, and get ready for a shocker, is that Thiel happens to be a part of the Bilderberg Group and its steering committee!

Now, why would Peter Thiel, a seemingly evil investor and tech guru that invested in Facebook and has pushed an NSA spying agenda, donate to the Ron Paul campaign?

...Thiel, in recent weeks, has seemed to show himself to be an advocate for liberty and possibly his support for Ron Paul affirms that...

...Thiel is an insider to the highly secretive group, who uses the position to influence or report on their secret doings. He has had controversial views that have been expressed in talks at Stanford University though – arguing that there is a technological deceleration. “Whether we look at transportation, energy, commodity production, food production, agro-tech, nanotechnology – that with the exception of computers, we’ve had tremendous slowdown,” he says. Technology can be used for good – and bad.

Drones, spyplanes, backscatter imaging machines. They are all being abused, mistreated, and used for the nefarious against Americans and others. GMO too, is controversial...

Thiel may have something here; it’s all about what he advocates though. For this reason, maybe he endorses Ron Paul because of less control and more freedom to invent. That’s good, if it’s true. Yet, we might already know, he has endorsed NSA and has backed many of it’s projects, like Facebook.


http://planet.infowars.com/business/wha ... berg-group


...oh....but thats not all...


Ron Paul Wants to Abolish the CIA; His Largest Donor Builds Toys for It
Why does 76 percent of the civil libertarian’s Super PAC money come from billionaire Peter Thiel, whose Palantir Technologies helps the government spy on citizens?

If there’s one thing that distinguishes Ron Paul from the rest of the GOP field, it’s his principled stand against American empire and his ardent defense of individual liberties. Paul’s opposition to wars, bloated defense budgets and government espionage of US citizens has made him a hero among some young conservatives. His seemingly rock-solid principles and radicalism has even drawn some on the left; unlike even left-wing Democrats, Paul has said he wants to abolish both the CIA and the FBI to protect individual “liberty.”

So it should come as a shock and disappointment to his followers that Ron Paul’s single largest donor—his Sheldon Adelson, as it were—founded a controversial defense contractor, Palantir Technologies, that profits from government espionage work for the CIA, FBI and other agencies, and which last year was caught organizing an illegal spy ring targeting American political opponents of the US Chamber of Commerce, including journalists, progressive activists and union leaders. (Palantir takes its name from the mystic stones used by characters in Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings to spy one another.)

According to recently filed FEC disclosure documents, Ron Paul’s Super PAC has received nearly all of its money from a single source, billionaire Peter Thiel. So far, Thiel has contributed $2.6 million to Ron Paul’s Super PAC, Endorse Liberty, providing 76 percent of the Super PAC’s total intake.

Thiel, a self-described libertarian and opponent of democracy who made his fortune as the founder of PayPal, launched Palantir in 2004 to profit from what the Wall Street Journal described as “the government spy-services marketplace.” The CIA’s venture capital firm, In-Q-Tel, was brought in to back up Thiel as one of Palantir’s first outside investors. Today, Palantir’s valuation is reported to be in the billions.

A recent Businessweek profile explained how Palantir makes its money—and why Ron Paul’s followers should be bothered:

Depending where you fall on the spectrum between civil liberties absolutism and homeland security lockdown, Palantir’s technology is either creepy or heroic. Judging by the company’s growth, opinion in Washington and elsewhere has veered toward the latter. Palantir has built a customer list that includes the U.S. Defense Dept., CIA, FBI, Army, Marines, Air Force, the police departments of New York and Los Angeles, and a growing number of financial institutions trying to detect bank fraud. These deals have turned the company into one of the quietest success stories in Silicon Valley—it’s on track to hit $250 million in sales this year—and a candidate for an initial public offering. Palantir has been used to find suspects in a case involving the murder of a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement special agent, and to uncover bombing networks in Syria, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. “It’s like plugging into the Matrix,” says a Special Forces member stationed in Afghanistan who requested anonymity out of security concerns. “The first time I saw it, I was like, ‘Holy crap. Holy crap. Holy crap.’ ”

It gets worse: the technologies and know-how acquired over years of spying on suspected foreign terrorists and threats were turned to private, political use against US citizens. In what became known last year as the “Chamber-Gate” scandal, Palantir was outed by Anonymous as the lead outfit in a private espionage consortium with security technology companies HBGary and Berico; the groups spent months “creating electronic dossiers on political opponents of the Chamber through illicit means.”

Thiel’s Palantir and its two intelligence contractor partners—collectively named “Team Themis”after the Roman goddess of law and order—proposed to the Chamber’s lawyers a plan that involved illegal cyber-espionage against the Chamber’s enemies, including targeting activists’ families and children. Among those targeted: ThinkProgress, union leaders, MoveOn, Brad Friedman and Glenn Greenwald, whose support for Wikileaks reportedly rankled Chamber member Bank of America.

Thiel has funded a number of far-right-wing causes over the years: He was an early investor in conservative filmmaker James O’Keefe’s career, funding a video called “Taxpayer’s Clearing House,” which shows O’Keefe duping working-class minorities into believing they’d won a sweepstakes, only to stick them with a tax bill for the bailouts. O’Keefe, of course, later produced the infamous ACORN and Planned Parenthood videos and was also charged with entering a federal building under false pretenses in an attempt to wiretap the offices of US Senator Mary Landrieu. Thiel was a member of the right-wing Federalist Society while at Stanford Law School, and he co-authored an anti–affirmative action book, The Diversity Myth: Multiculturalism and Political Intolerance on Campus—a book that belittles “imaginary oppressors” of minorities...

http://www.thenation.com/article/166421 ... z2WFYNuic6



With a Ku-Klux muu-muu
In the back of the truck,
If you ain't Born Again,
They wanna mess you up, screamin':
"No abortion, no-siree!"
"Life's too precious, can't you see!"
(What's that hangin' from a neighbor's tree?
Why, it looks like 'colored folks' to me—
Would THEY do THAT . . .
They've been doin' it for years!
Seriously?)
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 11, 2013 5:28 am 
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I still think it is doubtful whether Ron Paul is a racist, or at least any more racist than many other politicians, both democrat and republican are. Equally, I don't think he is any more or less religious than many other politicians in the US. It also now appears that both the Republicans and the Democrats have been involved in perpetuating and increasing the power of the NSA, so I would criticize them all for it.
What I personally find distasteful (and it's just my opinion) is the economic policy he proposes. It just so happens that this economic policy is what makes him attractive for the right of the Republican party and what is interesting is the way what I would term the extreme right of the Republican party is increasingly beginning to embrace him and his son.

Ron Paul says to Laura Ingraham ( :!:) that "Rand and I are very close on the issues, he's a little bit better at presenting things"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FnsbryJL ... e=youtu.be

(I seem to remember somebody suggesting that Rand and Ron did not share the same platform. It appears that they do and Ingraham approves).

And I'm afraid Sarah Palin has declared that she is now on "team [Rand] Paul" versus Chris Christie-
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHQ1xCTs ... e=youtu.be (at around 4.45 if you can't be bothered to hear the rest of Sarah's gabbling).

With friends like that, who needs enemies?

_________________
"Secluded from mankind by his exalted dignity, the truth is concealed from his knowledge; he can see only with their eyes, he hears nothing but their misrepresentations."


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 11, 2013 9:53 am 
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SPACEBROTHER wrote:
Ku-Klux


You're a racist!!!


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