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PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2014 8:24 pm 
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The chickens are coming home to roost...

Quote:
After former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell took the stand in his corruption trial, a narrative worthy of a nighttime soap opera got even juicier...

Jurors had already heard how his wife, Maureen, had turned the Executive Mansion into a house of workplace horrors with her incessant yelling at employees. Then Bob McDonnell laid bare the most intimate details of his crumbling marriage. The wow moment came when the defense introduced McDonnell's letter to his wife begging her to work with him to repair the relationship.

Marital discord is a key element of the defense as the McDonnells fight charges that they accepted more than $165,000 in gifts and loans from a businessman for promoting his company's dietary supplements. The theory is that they weren't communicating, so they couldn't have conspired...

http://news.msn.com/crime-justice/trial ... -testimony


Quote:
Gov. Rick Perry turns himself in on public corruption charges

...Perry faces one charge of abuse of official capacity, a first-degree felony, and one charge of coercion of a public servant, a third-degree felony.

Both charges stem from a threat Perry made last summer to veto $7.5 million in state funding for the public corruption unit of Travis County District Attorney Rosemary Lehmberg unless she resigned after a drunken driving charge.

After Lehmberg refused to step down, Perry carried out his veto...

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politic ... z3BHQhQQmw



So much for Tea Party Libertarianism. They're even more corrupt than the corrupt people they claimed to be fighting against.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2014 9:18 pm 
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It's the way of the world


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 26, 2014 11:25 pm 
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Zappa Drum Legend Terry Bozzio on Touring the World's Largest Tuned Kit

The Missing Persons/Fantômas/Korn pounder hitting 40 American dates playing giant, melodic kit

By Christopher R. Weingarten | August 26, 2014

Terry Bozzio — one of rock drumming's most formidable and brain-circuiting forces — is currently touring America, playing solo dates on "the world's largest tuned drum and percussion set." Best known as the hurricane behind Frank Zappa's late-Seventies and early-Eighties work, and the hit-maker behind new wave powerhouse Missing Persons, Bozzio, 63, is hoping to shed his reputation as technical solo shredder. Following successful tours in Europe and Japan, "An Evening With Terry Bozzio," is the first time he's touring a melodic solo percussion performance in North America — hitting 40 dates, playing on two-and-a-half octaves of tuned tom-toms and eight notes of bass drum. We caught up with him to ask the drumming legend exactly how he's lugging this thing across America.

How are you doing?
Man, I'm in hell right now!

Do tell...
I'm on my way to San Diego for the first gig of the big tour here and we snapped a serpentine belt in my SUV, so we're trying to find a garage to fix it in and make the gig on time.

So, wait, are you doing this tour in your own SUV?
Yeah, I always do that. We tow a trailer with my drums — it's me, my wife, and my tech — and that's how we do it.

So this is your first solo tour of America doing this?
Yeah. Essentially for me, personally, it's like doing same thing, different day; it's just packaging. My problem's always been how to market myself, so now I have a booking agent and a press guy who's come to bat for me and they believes in me. The idea of a solo drummer is a difficult thing to get across to people. They think of the thrashing and bashing of a typical rock-concert drum solo. And what I do is not that [laughs]. So, basically, I've been doing the same type of playing under the guise of a drum and cymbal commercial for 25 years — maybe 30 years now — for Sabian or Drum Workshop drums. And what I'm doing now is taking it to a more public level.

It certainly got our attention more than a drum clinic would…
So, what I do, is my drums are tuned to chromatic and diatonic pitches and I have, I guess, I have two and a half, three octaves or so of notes to play on the toms. And then I have the eight different white notes of the piano as my bass drums. So I'm able to accompany myself much the same way a pianist would — with his left hand playing the bass notes and the right hand soloing against it. And that's how I approach the drum-set. It's very melodic, it's compositional — it's also improvisational — but I improvise in a compositional matter, it's not just patterns and shredding and crap that you go, "Man, this guy does that perfectly. If on only if it meant something, you know?" L.A., it seems, has a glut of those kind of players that are just really enviable in their technique but don't really say much, or maybe they don't want to something that would make a producer not hire them for a session. So, for myself, it's a pretty much a complete musical statement on the drums, and it doesn't lose the primitive and the bashing and that fiery rock stuff that happens on the drum set. Otherwise, I'd just be a pianist or a marimba player.

It's kind of a neat thing that it's happened this year in the States because this is the 50th anniversary of my first drum lesson. It's kind of neat how life and fate all work together, and here I am sitting in a broken car, sweating, hoping I'll make the first gig. [laughs]

What's amazing is that you have one drum tech to help set this behemoth up. It seems like it would take an army.
I'm really into design and efficiency. I do this myself without a tech, sometimes, and I watch my techs suffer through certain things that I haven't prepared properly. So, it's a real efficient machine: The rack comes apart in several pieces but just rides on top of the cases in the back of the trailer. So, you could load that in, put in on a carpet that's already marked, and it goes up in about five minutes. Then you just pop on the drums, pop on the cymbal booms, and the kit's pretty much there.

The latest innovation is I have 22 pedals all attached to linkages and different bass drums and hi-hats that are remote — they're out where I can't play them directly. The pedal part's by my foot and the beater part is out by the bass drum, six feet away. And these 22 pedals all have to be attached and tweaked every day so they don't interfere with each other and they feel right. I just built these templates — so just by setting three templates down, all 22 pedals are ready to be connected. So things like that makes it go fast.

You have the kit details on your website from 2012 — have you added or subtracted from that kit?
I think that one's my Japanese kit. I have three of these big kits: one here, one in Europe, and one in Japan. They're all a little bit different, and they all look really cool, and they're a structural statements in and of themselves, but they do follow a function: putting instruments as close as possible to me so that I can play in a relaxed fashion. It is probably is the largest practical drum set in the world. There's guys in the Guinness Book of World Records that have larger drum sets. I'm not really interested in the circus act part of it at all.

So you can say that you will use every piece on this kit at some point?
Some nights, I might not hit certain things or do certain things, but within a week, I will have used everything [laughs].

You can see the footage of you 40 years ago with Zappa, and the kits are big, but they're not enormous. When did you fall in love with the idea of building this giant sculpture?
When I started to develop that electronic kit that I got the patents for in the Eighties and played on the second Missing Persons tour, I had 36 or 32 sounds in this one little three-foot bar in front of me. I got used to having all those things. And when I went back to playing acoustic, I started to add bells and some hi-hats and different things, but I was missing from the electronic kit.

Then someone called me and said, “Do you want to do clinics?" Ashamedly, I said yeah, OK 'cause I need the money and I kind of failed as a singer/pop artist and trying to be like Phil Collins. And during the time, I was depressed and started practicing. It was like a meditation, like a therapy for me. I kept thinking, “Why am I practicing? I'm already a good enough drummer that I'm almost alienating others in the music business by it. If I start practicing and getting better, nobody's going to hire me." So I began this thing of doing the clinics and working with the different companies, you find that, "Oh, Remo's rototom castings, if you take them apart, you can use them as this really weird-sounding hi-hat" and I still use those. I had DW build me a take-off on the double pedal and I had them reverse the machinery so that the pedals was near me and the beater would be hitting a remote bass drum. And that stretched into using some big China hi-hats to kind of get a grancassa e piatti marching sound, you know? So I had remote hi-hats. Then when I went to the rack, you get rid of all these tripods and you put the drums on a rack and you go, “Man, I've got room for this and this and this under here." And so before you know it, you just start adding whatever you can when you hear a sound in your head that you think would be a cool addition to some music that you're trying to play. So it was really an evolution… There's a great drummer by the name of Jojo Mayer and he's from Switzerland and he's got this thick kind of Swiss/German accent, and he goes, “Bozzio, every time I see you, your drum set, it's growing like a fungus, man." [laughs]

You're getting away from the clinic ideas and expressing yourself musically, but when most people explain who you are, they mostly point to the technical aspect of "The Black Page," the highly complex piece Zappa wrote specifically for you. Is that weird?
I mean, people say shit all the time, man; I don't pay much attention to it. I've played now with some of the best drummers in the world... And Miles [Davis] and Joe [Zawinul] are dead, so I don't choke much due to someone I want to impress being in the audience. Well, OK, I don't know anything about brain surgery. So if you imagine the greatest brain surgeons talking about this one brain surgeon and how cool he is, what the hell would I know about that? So "The Black Page" is kind of the same thing to musicians or drummers – they don't know about things like that. I always say, “Hell, Chad Wackerman and Vinnie Colaiuta had played way more difficult stuff than "The Black Page" right after I left Zappa.

I don't want to not use it as a promotional device and as a feather in my cap; I'm not belittling it at all. And the compliments Zappa gave me around it, were, you know, really wonderful. Him saying, “You're a fuckin' genius," when I played it for him really correctly one night with feeling and everything he needed. That kind of stuff, I carry with me. That's meaningful. Yeah, so that's how I feel about "The Black Page." Really glad I got to do it and honored and all, but music is the most important thing — not technique.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 27, 2014 5:18 am 
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Child firing Uzi at Arizona shooting range accidentally kills instructor, police say

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/26/us/arizona-girl-fatal-shooting-accident/index.html

1. A child is scarred for life
2. A man is dead
3. The NRA will rush to offer some pre-written pat empathy statement and say that 'These things happen.'

:P :P :P :P :P

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Ignorant parents and an awful business. May they go bankrupt soon. :(

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 27, 2014 8:19 am 
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Gray_Ghost wrote:
Image

Zappa Drum Legend Terry Bozzio on Touring the World's Largest Tuned Kit

The Missing Persons/Fantômas/Korn pounder hitting 40 American dates playing giant, melodic kit

By Christopher R. Weingarten | August 26, 2014

Terry Bozzio — one of rock drumming's most formidable and brain-circuiting forces — is currently touring America, playing solo dates on "the world's largest tuned drum and percussion set." Best known as the hurricane behind Frank Zappa's late-Seventies and early-Eighties work, and the hit-maker behind new wave powerhouse Missing Persons, Bozzio, 63, is hoping to shed his reputation as technical solo shredder. Following successful tours in Europe and Japan, "An Evening With Terry Bozzio," is the first time he's touring a melodic solo percussion performance in North America — hitting 40 dates, playing on two-and-a-half octaves of tuned tom-toms and eight notes of bass drum. We caught up with him to ask the drumming legend exactly how he's lugging this thing across America.

How are you doing?
Man, I'm in hell right now!

Do tell...
I'm on my way to San Diego for the first gig of the big tour here and we snapped a serpentine belt in my SUV, so we're trying to find a garage to fix it in and make the gig on time.

So, wait, are you doing this tour in your own SUV?
Yeah, I always do that. We tow a trailer with my drums — it's me, my wife, and my tech — and that's how we do it.

So this is your first solo tour of America doing this?
Yeah. Essentially for me, personally, it's like doing same thing, different day; it's just packaging. My problem's always been how to market myself, so now I have a booking agent and a press guy who's come to bat for me and they believes in me. The idea of a solo drummer is a difficult thing to get across to people. They think of the thrashing and bashing of a typical rock-concert drum solo. And what I do is not that [laughs]. So, basically, I've been doing the same type of playing under the guise of a drum and cymbal commercial for 25 years — maybe 30 years now — for Sabian or Drum Workshop drums. And what I'm doing now is taking it to a more public level.

It certainly got our attention more than a drum clinic would…
So, what I do, is my drums are tuned to chromatic and diatonic pitches and I have, I guess, I have two and a half, three octaves or so of notes to play on the toms. And then I have the eight different white notes of the piano as my bass drums. So I'm able to accompany myself much the same way a pianist would — with his left hand playing the bass notes and the right hand soloing against it. And that's how I approach the drum-set. It's very melodic, it's compositional — it's also improvisational — but I improvise in a compositional matter, it's not just patterns and shredding and crap that you go, "Man, this guy does that perfectly. If on only if it meant something, you know?" L.A., it seems, has a glut of those kind of players that are just really enviable in their technique but don't really say much, or maybe they don't want to something that would make a producer not hire them for a session. So, for myself, it's a pretty much a complete musical statement on the drums, and it doesn't lose the primitive and the bashing and that fiery rock stuff that happens on the drum set. Otherwise, I'd just be a pianist or a marimba player.

It's kind of a neat thing that it's happened this year in the States because this is the 50th anniversary of my first drum lesson. It's kind of neat how life and fate all work together, and here I am sitting in a broken car, sweating, hoping I'll make the first gig. [laughs]

What's amazing is that you have one drum tech to help set this behemoth up. It seems like it would take an army.
I'm really into design and efficiency. I do this myself without a tech, sometimes, and I watch my techs suffer through certain things that I haven't prepared properly. So, it's a real efficient machine: The rack comes apart in several pieces but just rides on top of the cases in the back of the trailer. So, you could load that in, put in on a carpet that's already marked, and it goes up in about five minutes. Then you just pop on the drums, pop on the cymbal booms, and the kit's pretty much there.

The latest innovation is I have 22 pedals all attached to linkages and different bass drums and hi-hats that are remote — they're out where I can't play them directly. The pedal part's by my foot and the beater part is out by the bass drum, six feet away. And these 22 pedals all have to be attached and tweaked every day so they don't interfere with each other and they feel right. I just built these templates — so just by setting three templates down, all 22 pedals are ready to be connected. So things like that makes it go fast.

You have the kit details on your website from 2012 — have you added or subtracted from that kit?
I think that one's my Japanese kit. I have three of these big kits: one here, one in Europe, and one in Japan. They're all a little bit different, and they all look really cool, and they're a structural statements in and of themselves, but they do follow a function: putting instruments as close as possible to me so that I can play in a relaxed fashion. It is probably is the largest practical drum set in the world. There's guys in the Guinness Book of World Records that have larger drum sets. I'm not really interested in the circus act part of it at all.

So you can say that you will use every piece on this kit at some point?
Some nights, I might not hit certain things or do certain things, but within a week, I will have used everything [laughs].

You can see the footage of you 40 years ago with Zappa, and the kits are big, but they're not enormous. When did you fall in love with the idea of building this giant sculpture?
When I started to develop that electronic kit that I got the patents for in the Eighties and played on the second Missing Persons tour, I had 36 or 32 sounds in this one little three-foot bar in front of me. I got used to having all those things. And when I went back to playing acoustic, I started to add bells and some hi-hats and different things, but I was missing from the electronic kit.

Then someone called me and said, “Do you want to do clinics?" Ashamedly, I said yeah, OK 'cause I need the money and I kind of failed as a singer/pop artist and trying to be like Phil Collins. And during the time, I was depressed and started practicing. It was like a meditation, like a therapy for me. I kept thinking, “Why am I practicing? I'm already a good enough drummer that I'm almost alienating others in the music business by it. If I start practicing and getting better, nobody's going to hire me." So I began this thing of doing the clinics and working with the different companies, you find that, "Oh, Remo's rototom castings, if you take them apart, you can use them as this really weird-sounding hi-hat" and I still use those. I had DW build me a take-off on the double pedal and I had them reverse the machinery so that the pedals was near me and the beater would be hitting a remote bass drum. And that stretched into using some big China hi-hats to kind of get a grancassa e piatti marching sound, you know? So I had remote hi-hats. Then when I went to the rack, you get rid of all these tripods and you put the drums on a rack and you go, “Man, I've got room for this and this and this under here." And so before you know it, you just start adding whatever you can when you hear a sound in your head that you think would be a cool addition to some music that you're trying to play. So it was really an evolution… There's a great drummer by the name of Jojo Mayer and he's from Switzerland and he's got this thick kind of Swiss/German accent, and he goes, “Bozzio, every time I see you, your drum set, it's growing like a fungus, man." [laughs]

You're getting away from the clinic ideas and expressing yourself musically, but when most people explain who you are, they mostly point to the technical aspect of "The Black Page," the highly complex piece Zappa wrote specifically for you. Is that weird?
I mean, people say shit all the time, man; I don't pay much attention to it. I've played now with some of the best drummers in the world... And Miles [Davis] and Joe [Zawinul] are dead, so I don't choke much due to someone I want to impress being in the audience. Well, OK, I don't know anything about brain surgery. So if you imagine the greatest brain surgeons talking about this one brain surgeon and how cool he is, what the hell would I know about that? So "The Black Page" is kind of the same thing to musicians or drummers – they don't know about things like that. I always say, “Hell, Chad Wackerman and Vinnie Colaiuta had played way more difficult stuff than "The Black Page" right after I left Zappa.

I don't want to not use it as a promotional device and as a feather in my cap; I'm not belittling it at all. And the compliments Zappa gave me around it, were, you know, really wonderful. Him saying, “You're a fuckin' genius," when I played it for him really correctly one night with feeling and everything he needed. That kind of stuff, I carry with me. That's meaningful. Yeah, so that's how I feel about "The Black Page." Really glad I got to do it and honored and all, but music is the most important thing — not technique.



Just great Bozzio is a great drummer, to bad he can't get on with a band that makes money, that said Buddy Rich did more with a fraction of the drums, sounded better and managed to make some money.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 27, 2014 2:43 pm 
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Milton Bradley wrote:
Child firing Uzi at Arizona shooting range accidentally kills instructor, police say

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/26/us/arizona-girl-fatal-shooting-accident/index.html

1. A child is scarred for life
2. A man is dead
3. The NRA will rush to offer some pre-written pat empathy statement and say that 'These things happen.'

:P :P :P :P :P

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Ignorant parents and an awful business. May they go bankrupt soon. :(



I have no problem with people owning guns , but this child's father is the epitome of an ' irresponsible gun owner ' and should have his children taken away and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.
Just my opinion.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 27, 2014 4:32 pm 
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Problem is, there are too many irresponsible gun owners. Whether a person obtains a gun legally or illegally doesn't matter. The industry still makes it's blood money. They should be the ones held responsible for arming irresponsible people. The special interest lobbyist group known as the NRA is just another corrupt corporate driven organization only in it for the money. They don't give a fuck about rights or the Constitution, so long as it's tailored to funnel mass amounts of money into an industry, and who cares who dies in the process.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 28, 2014 12:24 am 
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pedro2 wrote:
I have no problem with people owning guns , but this child's father is the epitome of an ' irresponsible gun owner ' and should have his children taken away and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.
Just my opinion.


The father maybe a twat, but he's broken no laws.
The business and / or instructor is culpable - health & safety laws will show that - rightly so.
TT

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 28, 2014 12:51 am 
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‘Oh, my God – talk about a redirection’: Micky Dolenz on his most interesting post-Monkees job offer

During the periods in which Micky Dolenz wasn’t making a career with the Monkees, he’s typically busied himself with television production, film acting and stage work. That is, until a certain, very unlikely Rock and Roll Hall of Famer asked him to join his band.

“I get a call from Frank Zappa one day,” Dolenz tells Kevin Pollak. He said: “Micky, I just wondered — I know the Monkees show went off the air, and I’d like for you to be the drummer for the Mothers of Invention.”

All of this took place, Dolenz says, “about a year after” the Monkees TV program ended in 1968 — “or maybe less even.” That would have been around the time the original Mothers lineup, featuring Jimmy Carl Black on drums, initially split.

“We were still under contract to Colgems and [fellow Monkees] David [Jones] and Mike [Nesmith] and I were still recording,” Dolenz adds. “Peter [Tork], I think he had left the group. Frank Zappa lived down the street from me, and he’d been on the show. He was a huge fan. Mike had had him on the show, and he was in the movie Head, as you may remember. He lived down the street from me in Laurel Canyon, and we hung out. We’d go back and forth, and go to parties.”

Given an opportunity to actually join the Mothers, however, Dolenz admits that his first thought was an unprintable exclamation. His second? “Oh, my God — talk about a redirection,” Dolenz says. “Talk about getting off the Monkee train!”

There was one catch, of course. Dolenz had to get out of his record deal — and Colgems flatly refused. “They said, ‘No way,’” he tells Pollak, meaning Dolenz instead remained a Monkee. By 1970, Zappa had retooled the Mothers of Invention, and Aynsley Dunbar could be found at the drums.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2014 6:26 pm 
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Student arrested for writing about shooting a DINOSAUR

A South Carolina high school student was arrested and suspended after handing in a class assignment in which he wrote about killing his neighbor’s pet dinosaur with a gun he purchased to “take care of the business.”

http://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest- ... d-dinosaur

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 12:05 am 
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http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/a ... lustration
Previously unknown chapter of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory published.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 12:33 am 
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BBP wrote:
http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/aug/29/lost-chapter-charlie-chocolate-factory-roald-dahl-quentin-blake-illustration
Previously unknown chapter of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory published.

Interesting. Thank you for this, BBP.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2014 4:53 am 
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Death Valley rock mystery finally solved

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The cracking sounds were ferocious. An ankle-deep, frozen lake in Death Valley National Park was breaking apart under sunny skies.

As cousins Richard Norris and James Norris watched, a light wind began moving huge floes of ice across the surface of the water and into rocks weighing up to 200 pounds (91 kg).

Propelled by the ice masses, the rocks began to slide across the slick, muddy bottom of the normally dry lake bed, known as "the Racetrack Playa".

"My god, Jim, it's happening," Richard yelled.

James Norris grabbed a camera.

Their photos last December 21 provided the final evidence in solving a mystery of the Racetrack Playa that has long puzzled visitors and scientists: What mechanism moves rocks across flat dirt in the heart of the hottest, driest place on earth?

Rocks of various heft - some weighing 600 pounds or more - leave trails that wiggle like snakes or form complete loops or even rectangles. The trails are cut sharply into the earth but no other tracks are visible.

Theories over the decades have included sporadic hurricane-force winds when the surface is covered with rain water, or rocks carried across the mud by small rafts of ice, or UFOs.

But until the Norrises had an incredible stroke of luck that day in December, no one had scientifically verified the phenomenon. The findings were formally presented on Wednesday in the online scientific journal PLOS ONE.

"I'm amazed by the irony of it all," James Norris said, nodding toward the glistening playa earlier this month.

"In a place where rainfall averages 2 inches (5 cm) a year, rocks are being shoved around by mechanisms typically seen in arctic climes."

"And the movement is incredibly slow," he added. "These rocks clock in at about 15 feet (4.5 m) per minute."

EPISODIC MOVEMENTS

Geologists have been studying the moving rocks since 1948, when the first scientific study suggested they were driven by dust devils.

One reason the mystery endured is that the movements are episodic, often with no motion for periods of decades until a precise series of natural events occurs.

The first requirement is rain in a parched climate. Next, temperatures must fall low enough to freeze the water before it evaporates. Then the sun has to come out and thaw the ice. Finally, wind has to blow strongly enough to break the ice into floes and move it across shallow water underneath. Even a light wind will do.

Ralph Lorenz, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory who had investigated playa rock movement for a decade, believed strongly enough that ice floes were the cause that he erected time lapse cameras in the area about seven years ago. But they failed to record the phenomenon.

The Norrises subscribed to a different theory, believing hurricane-force winds were the cause.

Richard Norris, 55, a paleobiologist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and James, 59, a research engineer, launched their "Slithering Stones Research Initiative" in 2011.

Over the next two years, friends and relatives armed with permits from the National Park Service helped them install a weather station in the area and place 15 stones equipped with global positioning devices on its pancake-flat surface.

The "GPS stones", which were engineered to record movement and velocity, were stationed at the southern end of the playa where rocks begin their strange journeys after tumbling down a cliff.

MYSTERY SOLVED

On December 20, 2013, Richard and James Norris returned to inspect the instruments.

"We found the playa covered with ice," Richard recalled. "We also noticed fresh rock trails near shards of thin ice stacked up along the shoreline."

The following afternoon, "we were sitting on a mountainside and admiring the view when a light wind kicked up and the ice started cracking," he said. "Suddenly, the whole process unfolded before our eyes."

"There was a side of me that was wistful," James Norris added, "because the mystery was no more."

A review of the weather data showed that a rare winter storm had dropped about 1 1/2 inches of rain and 7 inches of snow on the region in late November. The playa was transformed into a shallow lake where the GPS stones recorded movements on sunny days with light winds following nights of subfreezing temperatures.

James Norris' photographs put it all in perspective. Panes of ice hundreds of feet across and as thin as 1/4-inch thick blew into rocks. The rocks slid along the slushy, slippery mud on trajectories determined by the direction and velocity of the winds.

The cousins first shared the news with Lorenz, whose specialty is the Saturn moon of Titan and who became one of the five authors of the PLOS ONE study.

"While it takes away the mystery, it also underscores what an amazingly rare and wonderful mechanism is at work there," Lorenz said.

After viewing the photos earlier this month, Richard Friese, Death Valley's hydrologist, said he was glad to see the matter resolved. But he said the park worries that visitors will flock to the remote playa, which is accessible by a treacherous, rocky road that often strands ill-equipped motorists whose cars have multiple flat tires.

The Norris cousins' fascination with the region began in the 1960s, when their fathers - who were brothers and noted scientists - took them on excursions to the forbidding wilderness of scruffy mountains, buckled earth and geological mystery.

Standing beside a fresh zigzagging trail on the playa this month, under an evening sky filled with stars and bats, James Norris said, "Wouldn't our fathers have loved to have known this?"


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2014 11:26 am 
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Bad news for Micheal Schenker Group. Guitars and new album stolen.

http://ultimateclassicrock.com/michael- ... io-robbed/

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2014 11:46 am 
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Gray_Ghost wrote:
Death Valley rock mystery finally solved

Interesting article. Thanks for posting.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 3:20 am 
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Former Virginia Gov. McDonnell and Wife Found Guilty
Jury Backs Government Charge That Couple Broke Law by Accepting Lavish Gifts from a Donor

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RICHMOND, Va.—A jury found former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell and his wife, Maureen, guilty of a slate of public-corruption charges on Thursday, rejecting the couple's defense that their marriage was too broken for them to conspire and that they didn't accept lavish gifts in exchange for backing a wealthy donor's business.

Mr. McDonnell broke down in tears and covered his face with his hands as the verdict was read. The former Republican governor was convicted on 11 conspiracy-related counts. Mrs. McDonnell maintained her composure, but appeared to battle tears as she learned that the jury found her guilty on nine counts, including conspiracy and obstruction of justice.

Mr. and Mrs. McDonnell had both pleaded not guilty to the 14 charges they faced. They were acquitted of making false statements on bank-loan applications and Mrs. McDonnell was found not guilty of charges related to accepting golf games and gear, among other things.

The jury of seven men and five women deliberated for about 48 hours after hearing testimony for more than a month in federal court, not far from the governor's mansion where the couple lived from 2010 through January.

Mr. and Mrs. McDonnell, who have five children and are both 60 years old, are expected to be sentenced Jan. 6 by Judge James R. Spencer. They face lengthy prison terms and hefty fines.

The McDonnells had no visible contact with each other Thursday and they left the courthouse separately.

As he drove off, Mr. McDonell told reporters: "All I can say is my trust remains in the Lord."

http://online.wsj.com/articles/former-virginia-gov-bob-mcdonnell-and-wife-found-guilty-on-public-corruption-charges-1409858382

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2014 3:31 am 
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coevad wrote:
Bad news for Micheal Schenker Group. Guitars and new album stolen.

http://ultimateclassicrock.com/michael- ... io-robbed/

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2014 10:17 am 
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The *SPAM* company GlaxoSmithKline accidentally leaked 45 liters of water that has been contaminated with polio bacteria.

Dear Frank, it's plain idiocy here. That's P- H - A - R- M - A - C - E - U - T - I - C - A - L.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 07, 2014 11:38 am 
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Alleged Bank Robber Arrested When Stolen Cash Falls Out of His Pants
Sep 7, 2014, 2:15 PM ET
By GEETIKA RUDRA via Good Morning America
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A California bank robbery suspect probably should have bought a bag with all the money he's accused of stealing since he was allegedly caught stuffing it down his pants during his getaway.

Shawn Lee Canfield was arrested after leaving a Chase bank in Merced County, California, with $2,748, police told ABC News affiliate KFSN in Fresno, California.

Officers spotted Canfield, 25, trying to shove the money down his pants and when they brought him back to the bank, the teller identified him as the robber.

Most of the money - $2,414 - fell out of Canfield's pants as he was walked through the police station.

During police questioning, the remainder - $334 - fell out of Canfield's pants when he was asked to stand up, police said.

And he almost got away with it, except for one thing: he's a fucking idiot...

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 2:53 am 
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bztwYFqSH58

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 7:46 am 
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Corrupt ex-New Orleans mayor Ray Nagin reports to jail for 10 years after living large on laundered money as city suffered in wake of Hurricane…

Not exactly what FZ had in mind when he said "One day everyone of those cocksuckers will get caught" but It'll do, pig.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 8:10 am 
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lapsed maps wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bztwYFqSH58

YOUGOGIRL!

Ramen!


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 9:33 am 
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tiboudre wrote:
lapsed maps wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bztwYFqSH58

YOUGOGIRL!

Ramen!



Her theory is full of holes... :mrgreen:


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 12:33 pm 
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Plook wrote:
tiboudre wrote:
lapsed maps wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bztwYFqSH58

YOUGOGIRL!

Ramen!



Her theory is full of holes... :mrgreen:


Is brain strain a growing problem in the US?


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2014 1:22 pm 
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Gray_Ghost wrote:
Plook wrote:
Her theory is full of holes... :mrgreen:


Is brain strain a growing problem in the US?



It appears people are noodling with the idea... :mrgreen:


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