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PostPosted: Sun Feb 27, 2011 4:15 pm 
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Davey Moire

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 28, 2011 4:21 am 
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Roy Estrada, Ray Collins, not necessarily in that order

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PostPosted: Fri Mar 04, 2011 6:04 pm 
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Hi,

I'm not sure that it is the "sidemen" (or "sidewomen") that made Frank what he was or what he put together.

Obviously, it helps, but then ... you can look at Woody Allen and you have the same thing ... actors and actresses just praying they have the chance to work with him ... why? ... the freedom, and the director know how to adjust and use that freedom to make the piece stand out ... without the proper atmosphere and the proper guidance to help situate and deploy those "sidemen", I sincerely doubt that the material would have been as good.

Frank heard the part that was good and let that person do it ... and not many folks have an ear for ... "that magic moment" ... as it is called in film, theater, and music. It's a true gift ... but seeing that vision, and work, is sometimes more important ... there are thousands of credible players out there that can play anything ... yet none of them stand out ... why? ... they don't know how to "shine", and neither are they next to a person that CAN SEE that "shine" ... which is usually more important in the end.

This goes along with my review of the Mojo TP issue and the fact that it had so many interviews with nobodies, and people that basically, still don't have a clue!

Sometimes, it is a massive honor ... to just be there with God ... as they say! ... those opportunities don't come up all the time, and give you more beauty to live out of in 5 minutes, or seconds, than the rest of your life!

Frank could see that "shine" ... and he found ways to use it, regardless ... what's so difficult about that? And it is that "shine" that allows us to sit here and still appreciate the amount of work taht was done ...


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PostPosted: Tue May 10, 2011 12:11 pm 
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Sorry I'm late to this thread, but nature called.

Is this the rhythm section/percussionists thread, or is anyone eligible?

If you define underrated as having the greatest gap between contribution and general recognition, then I would submit that Ed Mann and Sugar Cane Harris are the most underrated musicians in any of Frank's lineups. They are the Stan Musial and Jimmie Foxx of the Zappa band continuum.

I don't know that you'll find a greater percussionist than Mann, and this as a HUGE fan of Ruth Underwood. Some of his work is simply superhuman.

It also helps that I just relistened to Sharleena from the "Lost Episodes", and Sugar Cane makes that easily my favorite version of the classic.

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PostPosted: Thu May 12, 2011 12:33 am 
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I don't know if he's underrated, but Roy Estrada is probably the most important sideman in Zappa's career, as a bass player, pachuco falsetto and all round great guy!

Think the Soul Giants + the Mexican pope + bass playing for Black Napkins, Zoot Allures etc. + Baby Snakes ++++ 8)

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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 7:15 am 
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Caputh wrote:
Elliot Ingber
And I still want to know where Zappa takes over lead guitar solos on "Freak Out!" or if he does at all. I know Elliot Ingber is moving outside all the typical blues guitar moves but is Zappa showing any guitar mastery anywhere on "Freak Out!"?

--Bat

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PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 8:01 am 
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I love his stuff with Beefheart too - particularly on "the Spotlight Kid".

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