Zappa.com

The Official Frank Zappa Messageboards
It is currently Sat Aug 23, 2014 3:33 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 519 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 ... 21  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sat Apr 25, 2009 8:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 22, 2008 9:19 am
Posts: 4726
Location: in deepest, darkest Germany
THE RESIDENTS
Stranger than Supper
UWEB
Side One
22 minutes 42 Seconds
Side Two
23 minutes 04 Seconds

_________________
"I have learned from my mistakes, and I am sure I can repeat them exactly."


Last edited by Caputh on Tue Jun 23, 2009 9:11 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:50 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 3:44 pm
Posts: 1466
Location: An air base in Central Europe
__________________________Image__________________________________________________________________________

awesome disc!!!

A1 Come Sunday (dedicated to Johnny Hodges) (25:10)

B1 G N 6 (X' 70B) (dedicated to David Tudor) (8:52) (!)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2009 10:01 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 22, 2008 9:19 am
Posts: 4726
Location: in deepest, darkest Germany
He obviously had more to say about Johnny Hodges than David Tudor, or perhaps he disliked the latter intensely.

_________________
"I have learned from my mistakes, and I am sure I can repeat them exactly."


Last edited by Caputh on Sat Jul 04, 2009 6:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Apr 27, 2009 10:38 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 3:44 pm
Posts: 1466
Location: An air base in Central Europe
One thing I like about small effervescent labels (>Futura Marge) is that they don't seem to advocate filler material :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 4:27 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 3:44 pm
Posts: 1466
Location: An air base in Central Europe
Image
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

All Music Guide Review
4.5 / 5

Arthur Jones had one of the warmer and more romantic styles in "energy music," making this, his debut as a leader, a highly enjoyable set. While the late-'60s avant-garde jazz scene is typically associated with heated and furious solo flights, Jones managed to fuse his love of older bop and blues players with the prevalent tendencies of the day. In this way, Jones was as adept at caressing a ballad as he was at shredding apart a fast one. Both of these sides are in evidence -- quite literally -- on this disc. The searing "C.R.M." opens the session with a relentless frenzy of notes; cutting and slashing everything in it's path. It is one of four Jones originals. The evocative and gritty ballad "Sad Eyes" begins the second on a much different note. This piece as well as the opening bars of the album's closer, "Brother B," provide a wonderful example of an avant-garde player digging into his blues roots. Where Archie Shepp incorporated a soulful Ben Webster swagger into the New Thing, Jones applies the style of another elder statesman, particularly that of Johnny Hodges. The result is also reminiscent of Ornette Coleman's mid-'60s trio sessions with David Izenzon and Charles Moffett, only Jones had the tendency to employ more squeaks and growls than did Coleman. Bassist Beb Guerin and drummer Claude Delcloo round out the trio and both are given a good amount of solo/duet time on each side's opener. Scorpio was recorded only a month after the trio supported Jacques Coursil on his first Actuel date, the quartet session, Way Ahead. This is a very warm and firmly rooted free jazz record. Highly recommended. ~ Brandon Burke, All Music Guide

• Claude Delcloo
• Drums
• Beb Guérin
• Bass
• Arthur Jones
• Sax (Alto), Main Performer


sideA: 18:15

sideB: 20:30
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Image

Chris May (aaj):
Like "rarely performed" operas, "hard to find" recordings are often obscure for a prosaic reason: they're no good. Here's a monumental exception to the rule. The Black Ark—released in small numbers on the Freedom label in 1969, out of print almost overnight, and a holy grail for collectors practically ever since—is forty minutes of passionate and thrilling music, new-thing free jazz as great as practically any that came out of the late 1960s without saxophonist John Coltrane's name on it.
Seventeen years younger than Coltrane, alto saxophonist Noah Howard arrived in New York in 1965, aged 22. He formed a quartet, made a couple of albums for ESP, and—before moving to Europe in 1970—put together the septet which made The Black Ark. By 1969, Howard was terrifyingly good: as a player, composer and bandleader.
The four originals which make up The Black Ark—a mutant blues, a free jive samba, a cod-Japanese "ying-tong" melody and a wonderfully lyrical ballad—are catchy and hummable, at a time when most free jazz rejected tunes and structures (or was too untutored to create them). Howard brings a similar degree of form to his band: theme statements bookend each track, solos are taken individually ("Mount Fuji" contains the only section of extended collective improvisation), and the length of each player's solo is precisely pre-determined, with Howard taking the longest spots.
As an alto player, Howard is often tagged with Ornette Coleman. In fact, he sounds more like a tenor saxophonist, bringing to his smaller instrument much of the tenor's weight and booting force. He's a hefty player. The closest contemporary comparison is perhaps with tenor saxophonist Pharoah Sanders, another musician balancing ferocity with trippy melodicism, to their mutual advantage.
For unrelenting screaming banshee saxophone, the septet includes tenor player Arthur Doyle. As the original album's liner notes have it, in words that can't be bettered, Doyle is "propelled throughout by an almost incoherent rage, a chaotic and murderous sound." Howard's deft trick as leader is to keep Doyle's eruptions strictly time-constrained—a couple of choruses of sonic excess per solo, and out. Trumpeter Earl Cross, another furiously intense soloist, though a less tonally monolithic one, is similarly under manners. The result: neither player outstays his welcome and you don't have to be a smack head to enjoy them.
The rest of the band is a blast too, particularly the agile, powerhouse bassist Norris Jones and drummer Muhammad Ali (the younger brother of Coltrane's post-Elvin Jones drummer Rashied). Jimi Hendrix's Woodstock conga player, Juma, doesn't just add color, but working with Ali brings real propulsion to the music (the duo's interaction on "Mount Fuji" is a delight).
Almost forty years after its original release, undimmed by familiarity, this reissue is like a really, really late, really, really exciting birthday present.

Kurt Gottschalk (aaj):
Noah Howard's 1969 album The Black Ark has, in an unintended way, lived up to its name in recent years. It has become, to free jazz obsessives, a sort of Ark of the Covenant, a fabled and much sought after grail and jazz message boards lit up when it was announced that the British label Bo'Weavil would be putting the album out on CD.
Recent years have also shown a renewed interest in Howard's career, with new recordings on CIMP, Cadence, Ayler and Boxholder and an important reissue on Eremite pairing his 1971 album Patterns (by a sextet that included Han Bennink and Misha Mengelberg) with an unreleased 18-minute track from 1979 called "Message to South Africa" (with Johnny Dyani, Kali Fasteau, Noel McGee and Chris McGregor), recorded for Mercury in France but unissued because of its perceived militancy.
The Black Ark was Howard's third record as a leader. Released by Polydor after two ESP titles, it should have been his breakthrough. Instead it broke him. Unhappy with the lack of support for free jazz in the states, within three years he had left for Paris, eventually moving again to Belgium where he still lives. Record labels at the time were scrambling to figure out what was going on in jazz as well as rock and many worthy albums didn't get the proper promotion and distribution and were lost in the shuffle.
But The Black Ark was one that should have risen to the top. It is, in a sense, the missing link between Albert Ayler and Archie Shepp. Simple yet insistent melodies scream through the twin saxophones of Howard and, on his recording debut, Arthur Doyle before breaking down into strident, freeform marches. Like Ayler and Shepp, Howard here favors tunes that feel like work songs, or even nursery rhymes. With a third horn (Earl Cross on trumpet), the front line flies over the rumbling rhythms of Leslie Waldron (piano), Norris Sirone Jones (bass), Mohammed Ali (drums) and Juma (conga). Compared to the mountains of recordings released in today's market, the discography of revolutionary (politically and musically) jazz from the late '60s is rather small and it's fantastic to hear another piece of the picture.


sideA: 19:17

sideB: 21:14


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 7:12 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 22, 2008 9:19 am
Posts: 4726
Location: in deepest, darkest Germany
"Wing's Greatest"
A rather embarassing part of my record collection, I must admit to playing it on occasion, although I wish there was (in the words of that general wanker Robert Christgau), a stylus-width scratch across "My Love" (not to mention "Mull of Kintyre").

Side One: 27 minutes 58 seconds
Side Two: 25 minutes 50 seconds

_________________
"I have learned from my mistakes, and I am sure I can repeat them exactly."


Last edited by Caputh on Sat Jul 04, 2009 6:19 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2009 6:37 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 14, 2007 8:03 pm
Posts: 6098
Location: Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania
Image
Side 3- 21:48
Side 4- 20:38

_________________
"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 2:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 3:44 pm
Posts: 1466
Location: An air base in Central Europe
Image

A 23’43

B 22’10


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 7:42 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 24, 2007 7:14 am
Posts: 18626
Location: Kitchener, Ontario, CANADA
buffalo_voice wrote:
Image

A 23’43

B 22’10

Nah....it's only 14min. per side. It just seems like a long time before the record ends.

_________________
You're probably wondering why I'm here
(not that it makes a heck of a lot of a difference to ya)
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2009 8:45 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 3:44 pm
Posts: 1466
Location: An air base in Central Europe
:mrgreen: I like it. I also have the Soviet E.P.

Image


:)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun May 03, 2009 1:37 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 14, 2007 8:03 pm
Posts: 6098
Location: Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania
Image
Side 1- 20:11
Side 2- 21:53

_________________
"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri May 08, 2009 5:46 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 3:44 pm
Posts: 1466
Location: An air base in Central Europe
Image

A 27:55
B 22:05 (that makes 50:00 straight :) )


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2009 9:13 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 7:29 pm
Posts: 9577
Image

s2: i walk on gilded splinters [dr john creaux] – 23:25


from

Image

_________________
Image


Last edited by slime.oofytv.set on Sat Aug 11, 2012 1:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2009 9:00 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 3:44 pm
Posts: 1466
Location: An air base in Central Europe
Image
I 17’34

II 22’38 :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2009 9:18 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Dec 01, 2002 7:21 am
Posts: 1690
Location: SLS
Release with the longest playing time:
Following catagories

Single Artist:

LP: Dream House 78'17" 39:14 (B side)
CD: Amused To Death 72:38
CR-r:
12": California Dreams Volume 2 25:36
7": Five Miles Out 8:35 Take A Look 7:24 Hey Nineteen 7:22 Gigi L'Amoroso 6:59 The Secret Garden (Sweet Seduction Suite) 6:40

Various Artists / Best of:

LP:
CD: Technodrome Volume 12 (disc 2) 80:38 The Best Of Steely Dan, Then And Now 79:35
CD-r:
12": Hip Hop Funk Dance Classics Volume 2 25:00
7" : We Like Dogs 6:49

_________________
http://www.ssimfg.com/index.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 07, 2009 5:15 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Feb 24, 2007 7:14 am
Posts: 18626
Location: Kitchener, Ontario, CANADA
pedro1 wrote:
Release with the longest playing time:
7": Five Miles Out 8:35 Take A Look 7:24 Hey Nineteen 7:22 Gigi L'Amoroso 6:59 The Secret Garden (Sweet Seduction Suite) 6:40

I can beat that...

Image

_________________
You're probably wondering why I'm here
(not that it makes a heck of a lot of a difference to ya)
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 11, 2009 6:21 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 22, 2008 9:19 am
Posts: 4726
Location: in deepest, darkest Germany
pedro1 wrote:

CD: Amused To Death 72:38

Are you sure you don't mean 82:38? I'm sure of got a number of CDs that are longer than 73 minutes. Picking one out at random ;Stan Ridgway: "The Beyond Tomorrow Show Live @ the Coach House" (Disinformation Recordings 2002) is 76:58.

_________________
"I have learned from my mistakes, and I am sure I can repeat them exactly."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 2:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 31, 2002 2:46 am
Posts: 1843
Location: Between Texas & Paraguay...
Caputh wrote:
pedro1 wrote:

CD: Amused To Death 72:38

Are you sure you don't mean 82:38? I'm sure of got a number of CDs that are longer than 73 minutes. Picking one out at random ;Stan Ridgway: "The Beyond Tomorrow Show Live @ the Coach House" (Disinformation Recordings 2002) is 76:58.


My version of Amused To Death is indeed 72:38.
But let's not forget the album Lateralus by TOOL, that one is 78:58.

_________________
Alan Thicke: ''Now Frank, for those of us who have seen you as some kind of guru over the years, that's a kind of nihilistic assesment of music. Where's the hope ?''
Frank Zappa: ''Well, there isn't any...''


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: what I'm listening to
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 7:41 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Sep 23, 2005 9:14 am
Posts: 3134
it's been posted before
but 200 Motels side 4
I'm on a run of 4th sides today for some reason

_________________
" . . . On the outside now . . ."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2009 10:05 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Nov 22, 2008 9:19 am
Posts: 4726
Location: in deepest, darkest Germany
AbnucealEmukaah83 wrote:

My version of Amused To Death is indeed 72:38.

What I really meant was (no offence Pedro) was 72:38 doesn't appear to be particularly long. Although, on the other hand it is a Roger Waters album (gloom doom moan drone) :wink:

_________________
"I have learned from my mistakes, and I am sure I can repeat them exactly."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 7:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Oct 24, 2005 2:56 pm
Posts: 4716
Galoot Co-Log-Nuh wrote:
Image
Side 3- 21:48
Side 4- 20:38


I just got Works (vol 1 of course because vol 2 sucks ass) on vinyl for 3.95 and it's in fucking perfect condition! Sounds great through my Marantz 6100 with the Stanton 500EE on there!

I have about 60 records now! Most of which were only 50 cents to 3.95!

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 17, 2009 11:09 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 3:44 pm
Posts: 1466
Location: An air base in Central Europe
Huck_Phlem wrote:
Galoot Co-Log-Nuh wrote:
Image
Side 3- 21:48
Side 4- 20:38


I just got Works (vol 1 of course because vol 2 sucks ass) on vinyl for 3.95 and it's in fucking perfect condition! Sounds great through my Marantz 6100 with the Stanton 500EE on there!


Lend your love to me tonight, Huck 8)

Huck_Phlem wrote:
I have about 60 records now!

You're bitchin


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 12:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 19, 2002 10:51 pm
Posts: 2343
Location: Europe
Image

:wink: (see http://www.zappa.com/messageboard/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=17394)

_________________
"Everybody in this room is wearing a uniform, and don't kid yourself" - FZ
http://www.myspace.com/kirnehness


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 12:46 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 7:29 pm
Posts: 9577
HJ wrote:
... :wink: ...
the unofficial lp sides over 20 minutes thread

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jul 11, 2009 12:00 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Sep 14, 2007 8:03 pm
Posts: 6098
Location: Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania
STILL THE GREATEST THREAD OF ALL TIME!!!!!!

_________________
"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 519 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 ... 21  Next

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group