Zappa.com

The Official Frank Zappa Messageboards
It is currently Wed Apr 23, 2014 11:43 am

All times are UTC - 8 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2003 6:02 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 07, 2003 8:51 am
Posts: 5
Location: Lawrenceville NJ
I DON't like the Halloween disc for one simple reason.; why do I have to have surround sound and buy additional speakers to hear Frank properly?  I really wish they had simply issued a CD.  I shouldn't have to buy news technology.  Through the two little speakers on my TV the sound is WORSE than a regular CD.  I wish we weren't being pulled along by some marketing ploy to buy new tech shit.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2003 12:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 5:19 am
Posts: 5
Though I never met the man, I read on several occasions that he wanted his music heard through the finest sources possible. He was one of the pioneers when moving from analog to digital technology, so it only makes sense that the family should take full advantage of the latest and greatest audio formats. <br><br>True, a hybrid disc would be better, but that's an issue with DVD-A technology and marketing, not the ZFT or any other software distributor. And, no matter what, multi-channel music is here to stay despite complaints to the contrary. Just as stereo replaced mono to the consternation of traditionalists, and CDs replaced analog, multi-channel music will replace thin-sounding Red Book (a.k.a. standard) discs.<br><br>by the way, found a great review of Halloween on DVD Angle -- http://www.dvdangle.com/reviews/review.php?Id=3029


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2003 12:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 5:19 am
Posts: 5
All good points. The benefit of DVD-A (and its Sony-sponsored competitor, SACD) is not so much the mult-channel aspect as the higher resolution. Though more technical explanations can be found at DVD Angle, DVD Talk and other sites, the bottom line is that the format offers a wider frequency range and a more resonant soundstage. <br><br>For example, the Rolling Stones SACD discs on ABKCO feature two-channel mixes (along with a hybrid Red Book layer). No multi-channel mix to be found, but man, the SACD layer sounds amazing! Truly the best available versions of those classic albums.<br><br>Regarding the Halloween disc, you can play it any old DVD player, not just DVD-A. As you'll notice in the DVD Angle review, there is a two-channel mix that sounds just fine through two speakers. True, you need a DVD player, but with the U.S. installed base at 40 million, and low-end machines available for $70 at Costco, DVD is here to stay.<br><br>Again, I think the main mistake made by the DVD-A camp was assuming it did not have to release hybrid discs, so Halloween won't play in your car, though you can make a CD-R dub by using the analog outputs on the back of any standard DVD machine.<br><br>


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Mar 19, 2003 3:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 5:19 am
Posts: 5
Dropping to analog certainly isn't the preferable option, but it's a worst case scenario. If nothing else, you can hear the PCM stereo mix. I'm not as down on it as the guy who wrote the review; my guess is he's more of an audiophile. To each his own.<br><br>The to-each-his-own-ness is the coolest thing about DVD-A. Even if you don't own a top-flight player, it's possible to appreciate the recording. No matter which format wins out -- or if they live together in peace and harmony -- we're going to see increasing numbers of DVD-A and SACD products on the market.<br><br>Almost forgot: there is no great difference between the two formats, but they don't play well with each other. I may be wrong, but it's impossible to fit both on the same disc due to the space consumed by a high resolution layer. However, there are more than a few combination players starting to come out, priced anywhere from $400 - $1,000, with more on the lower end toward the end of the year.<br><br>Better this than cheesey mp3s. Ability to rip off artists aside, MP3s are to DVD-A/SACD products what "Friends" is to "The Simpsons"


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 20, 2003 8:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 5:19 am
Posts: 5
Here's an article from today's Billboard. This should move DVD-A into the mainstream:<br><br>Planned DVD-Audio Hybrid Will Play On CD Hardware <br><br><br> <br>A hybrid dual-layer version of DVD-Audio (DVD-A) that can play on both CD and DVD hardware is expected to hit the market in the next six months, sources tell Billboard Bulletin. The move should help spur consumer adoption of the burgeoning format.<br><br>The hybrid discs would operate in essentially the same way as dual-layer discs from rival format Super Audio CD (SACD), according to those familiar with the situation. SACDs are forward- and backward-compatible, allowing for playback of the format's high-resolution audio and enhanced features on both dedicated devices and standard CD players. <br><br>The move toward a DVD-A hybrid comes as a consortium of labels and technology companies -- most notably Warner Music Group (WMG), EMI Recorded Music, and BMG Entertainment -- are stepping up education efforts about the product. DVD-A supporters are attempting to position the format as a mass-market product, rather than merely an audiophile experience.<br><br>In a presentation at the National Association of Record Merchandisers (NARM) conference yesterday (March 19) in Orlando, Fla., executives from WMG, EMI, and other labels were pushing for retailers to embrace the new format. There are currently 500 DVD-A titles on the market, with distribution in 1,500 U.S. retail outlets.<br><br>In a discussion that accompanied the presentation, DVD-A advocates, including David Dorn, senior VP of media for Warner Strategic Marketing, noted that a shift to a new format is needed in part because consumers no longer see value in the CD. Retail and label executives acknowledged that DVD-A offers a better value proposition, with its ability to carry pictures, videos, lyrics, and downloadable portable music files all on one disc. The challenge, they said, is in creating consumer awareness for the product and building off the installed base of DVD hardware. <br><br><br>-- Brian Garrity, Orlando, Fla.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 8 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group