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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 2:50 pm 
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My_Name_Is_Fritz wrote:
Sam Peckinpah
John Ford
Martin Scorsese
Stanley Kubrick
Francois Truffaut
Luis Bunuel
Quentin Tarantino
Terry Gilliam
Francis Ford Coppola (for Apocalypse Now & The Godfather)
Jim Jarmusch


I would like to add:

Billy Wilder
Ari Kaurismäki
The Coen Brothers
Sergio Leone
and
Clint Eastwood - since he deserves it.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 2:53 pm 
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Oh yes, and Robert Altman of course.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2011 2:59 pm 
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Sergio Leone is awesome. The segues in Once Upon A Time In America are better than some entire movies. :)


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 5:23 pm 
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Gio. Shanger wrote:
Nack Blapkin wrote:
I still find it hard to believe that Zappa wanted to be known primarily as a filmmaker. I'd be interested to read your book though.
...
FL: (reading) Are these film treatments a conscious effort to break away from music?

FZ: No. I do music all the time. I like films.
...


This is actually not surprising ... if you check out the music, it is actually quite visual, and sometimes, the lyrics are not the only visual idea in it. Somehow we have this idea that "visual" means that the lyrics tell you what the music is supposedly about ... and I've always thought that quite a bit of the music was actually a movie ... and that is why some of the titles make so much sense ... but we only treat it all as rock music, or worse ... not an art! Even film has done better than that!


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 5:26 pm 
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Isaac wrote:
knepo wrote:
Be sure to watch Alphaville, une étrange aventure de Lemmy Caution by godard. It's his best film from my point of view, and a movie that would enter my 5 favorite movies


That's one of the films that I saw. I've also seen Keep Your Right Up! - which has some of the most unreadable subtitles I've ever seen. Who in their right minds would choose bold white text to put over a film that's 90% whiteness throughout the film? One of the dumbest moves ever made by a distributor, if I may say so. The VHS was put out by Facets Video in 2002.

[size=0]Isaac[/size]


That's the way the film was released and has been for years ... almost all of those 60's films had subtitles in white, and sometimes they are very tough to read ... and I wish that the French would start remastering some of those films before they lose them ... but I think they are waiting for Godard to die, so they don't have to pay him or his trust, or his wives! You see, then the government has a right to "protect" the art ... in the name of something or other!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 5:59 pm 
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Quilt wrote:
...
15 or so years ago I bought Uncle Meat on VHS. Probably the worst film I ever saw on that medium. I love the music on UM, the album, but the dialogue(!) excerpts are also utterly dire.
Only my opinion, and probably shaped by my complete disappointment at shelling out a lot of money (at the time) on something that I wanted to like (It was FZ after all!).


It's not film as you know it, and are used to it ... it was, and probably is, an experiment and some things worked and some didn't ... but that's like saying that half the Picasso stuff is shit!

The biggest problem with experimental stuff ... is one's perception of the medium ... and guess what you just got caught on? ... I'm not sure that the details that you offered were even descriptive of the experience of watching that film ... I have that video ... and am trying to find someone to transfer it to DVD for me ... because I don't have a TV or a video player!

Experiments are experiments, and I agree that not all of them work ... but I suppose that you could at least agree that more than half of them worked, or Frank would not be worth the discussion!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 6:02 pm 
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ursinator wrote:
Plook wrote:
Where is your sense of humor...Woody Allen anyone?

At least the 2nd time that this name appears here. Very disappointing. Maybe he needed to be a little bit taller for being not ignored so easily?


I doubt this can happen ... and you and I can see a group in the background of the film break into a Greek Chorus and sing ... but the effect and visual gets totally wasted because no one in this board even knows what a Greek Chorus is, and the whole thing ... dies ... stupid ... in the end, there is a lot of stuff like that in Woody Allen ... but while I don't think that people have to be educated to appreciate his work, the one thing they have to do ... AND BE ... is not totally fucked up and turn around and tell us that Batman and Jack Sparrow and Iron Man are the best films they have seen!


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2011 3:07 pm 
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Moshkito wrote:
ursinator wrote:
Plook wrote:
Where is your sense of humor...Woody Allen anyone?

At least the 2nd time that this name appears here. Very disappointing. Maybe he needed to be a little bit taller for being not ignored so easily?


I doubt this can happen ... and you and I can see a group in the background of the film break into a Greek Chorus and sing ... but the effect and visual gets totally wasted because no one in this board even knows what a Greek Chorus is, and the whole thing ... dies ... stupid ... in the end, there is a lot of stuff like that in Woody Allen ... but while I don't think that people have to be educated to appreciate his work, the one thing they have to do ... AND BE ... is not totally fucked up and turn around and tell us that Batman and Jack Sparrow and Iron Man are the best films they have seen!


Many of us know what a Greek chorus is. Stop being a condescending prick.

PS There is a correct way to use an ellipsis, and you are not doing so. ;)

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Last edited by FalseDichotomy on Sat Apr 23, 2011 3:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 23, 2011 3:30 pm 
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My favorite ten directors in no particular order:

Hal Hartley
Wong Kar Wai
Mel Brooks
Jim Jarmusch
David Lynch
Guy Maddin
Shinya Tsukamoto
John Hughes
Terry Gilliam
Lars von Trier

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 5:26 am 
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Moshkito wrote:
Quilt wrote:
...
15 or so years ago I bought Uncle Meat on VHS. Probably the worst film I ever saw on that medium. I love the music on UM, the album, but the dialogue(!) excerpts are also utterly dire.
Only my opinion, and probably shaped by my complete disappointment at shelling out a lot of money (at the time) on something that I wanted to like (It was FZ after all!).


It's not film as you know it, and are used to it ... it was, and probably is, an experiment and some things worked and some didn't ... but that's like saying that half the Picasso stuff is shit!

The biggest problem with experimental stuff ... is one's perception of the medium ... and guess what you just got caught on? ... I'm not sure that the details that you offered were even descriptive of the experience of watching that film ... I have that video ... and am trying to find someone to transfer it to DVD for me ... because I don't have a TV or a video player!

Experiments are experiments, and I agree that not all of them work ... but I suppose that you could at least agree that more than half of them worked, or Frank would not be worth the discussion!


Frank was a great musician/composer. In that medium he excelled.

Uncle Meat is extremely amateur in the way it is put together. The 'plot'/storyline/narrative/whatever is risible, or at least it was beyond my definition of entertainment. I am a huge Zappa fan but I don't believe everything he put out, some music included, was particularly good, and I refuse to distort my own definition of what is 'good' or 'worthwhile' just so I can appreciate the value of this motion picture/experiment. FWIW I also think that 200 Motels is shit, but is made tolerable by the music. But again, it is so shoddy as a film that I am not sure why he bothered. Maybe you had to be there to get into the spirit of it all.

Best wishes


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 5:26 pm 
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Here goes in random order:

Kubrick
Chaplin
Hitchcock
Spielberg
Woody Allen
Lynch
Trier
Scorsese
Nolan
Coen Brothers

The first ten coming to mind (Zappa could never cut it here).

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 30, 2011 6:35 pm 
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1. Lewis, Jerry

2. The rest

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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 3:52 pm 
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calvin2hikers wrote:
1. Lewis, Jerry

2. The rest

I didn't know you were a French person.

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PostPosted: Sun May 01, 2011 5:42 pm 
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Location: exile
in no particular order
the coen brothers
francis ford coppola
stanley kubrick
ingmar bergman
martin scorsese
david lynch
akira kurosawa
federico fellini
spike lee
alfred hitchcock

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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 7:27 pm 
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just plain doug wrote:
calvin2hikers wrote:
1. Lewis, Jerry

2. The rest

I didn't know you were a French person.


Ah yes, the French, the first to recognize the brilliance of Mr. Lewis.

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 12:01 pm 
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Lumpy Gravy wrote:
replace oliver stone with the coen brothers and I'm with you all the way. 8)


When comparing these two to many of the international directors, known or otherwise, these two come off as just Hollywood folks and nothing but ... a better version of television.

Oliver Stone sold out a long time ago ... and The Coen's are making everyone believe that something wierd is funny and cinematic. The physical side of the films, including camera work and music, is cheap, sophomoric and something that you would not even try to teach in a film school.

But because they are famous and their films are in all the video stores, we think they are great.

Sorry! Over hyped babies and royals in my book!


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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 12:22 pm 
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FalseDichotomy wrote:
Many of us know what a Greek chorus is. Stop being a condescending prick.
PS There is a correct way to use an ellipsis, and you are not doing so. ;)


Not trying to be a prick. Not worth the hassle and besides mine is too small to worry about and too old to bother trying to satisfy the rock'n'roll groupies. They wouldn't apreciate a tongue anyway! I hear they would rather have the whips and the chains, or the penguins!

Many people know what a Greek Chorus is, not questioning that but it seems you failed to appreciate the humor! But seeing it in front of you in a film, or musical, or play, or in 200 Motels, is not something that rock audiences and fans, usually discuss very well ... after all it is best to bitch about yet another guitar solo that is not released by the ZFT.

My apologies if all you can see is "condescension" ... when the point was not about condescension, but about the ability to read through and past what was in front of you ... and you failed!


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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 12:51 pm 
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Quilt wrote:
Frank was a great musician/composer. In that medium he excelled.
...
Uncle Meat is extremely amateur in the way it is put together. The 'plot'/storyline/narrative/whatever is risible, or at least it was beyond my definition of entertainment. I am a huge Zappa fan but I don't believe everything he put out, some music included, was particularly good, and I refuse to distort my own definition of what is 'good' or 'worthwhile' just so I can appreciate the value of this motion picture/experiment.
...


Agreed.

I probably am one of the very few film reviewers that gave that film a good review, specially at a time when it was kewl to trash it, and say some other Hollywood jackoff film is more valuable or important, simply because it made money and is "famous".

And this creates a problem. Your perception and mine!

If you happen to catch, let's say, 5 or 6 of the early Godard films, where he is vehement about making fun of Hollywood conventions for film, you end up finding one thing. Godard can be annoying as heck, and he is playing with your perception. You and I are so used to seeing this and that, that we can not even compare it to your perception or mine in a similar situation, but you accept Jack Sparrow's or a shot from the daily shows as important because they made this or that person famous, and that show gets used everywhere now.

In the end, the shot of the camera moving from left to right while the two lovers are having their discussion on the bar stools, is annoying as heck ... but you and I would probably be looking elsewhere or talking to someone else, and not give a damn about those two and their conversation anyway, if this was "not" a film!

Likewise, Godard throws music and visuals all over the place on purpose.

You can see more of this in a wonderful film that won an Oscar about cinematographers, called "Visions of Light" ... worth having in your collection, but take a look at what inspires and how it is done sometimes! ...

Now, the issue is ... does anyone do this with music? The answer is NO. On top of it, when you read many of the comments in this board ... there are many people that want the rock Frank and the jazz Frank ... and you and I know that he had an independent streak and this is what Varese and so many others mean to Frank, that means aboslutely nothing and total shit to most of us that even listen to music ... how many of us even have a Varese album? Or can say that we listened to it with a fair ear?

It was a time that allowed for that expression and experimentation ... and that is the most important part of it all ... and many people -- I call them how socialistic of them to think so! to nag at them! -- are not comfortable with the free form stuff, the different stuff, the totally off the wall stuff ... which sometimes includes nothing of meaning on purpose, because we are expecting that kiss to bring the movie audience an OHHHHHHHHHHH to last for 5 minutes so all the girls will come back and see it again!

This was what the whole artistic thing had been about, at least as far as the "surrealists" in 1930's with Bretton, Dali, Bunuel and others, which America did not see a lot of because of the depression. And the 60's, with all its drugs and what not, had a lot of that free form spirit, where sometimes it was more important to get out of the "comfort zone" than it was to see something different.

200 Motels is very good. If anything, it is the real representation of a time that was trying to find its way, and Frank knew that the "commercial" way was not it. But here we are, and compare the work to anything that is/was commercial, and the end result is? ... it will always be bad, because no one gets it and no one knows what it is about.

I look at it, as an attempt to do in film the same thing that he was doing in music ... turn it upside down and see what you got. The only sad thing about it is that most folks, even today, are only interested in the guitar god and they couldn't careless about the composer and the one person in rock music that actually made an effort at doing something else and hoped to come up with something new and something different.

This is my appreciation of Frank ... I couldn't careless for the release of the Roxy stuff or any more of the Overnight stuff, because in the end, all it is doing is glorify the rock hero guy, not the totality of who Frank was. I think the sale of the rock star is limited in time. The sale of the artist and his total work? Forever!

Quote:
...
Maybe you had to be there to get into the spirit of it all.
Best wishes


Not really. There is nothing in that time that you can't have today or not do. With one exception! And it is a major one! Music, then had an independent spirit and it was independent. Today, the only independence is commercialism done with the left index finger instead of the right index finger! And we're way too influenced by the popular music and top ten, to appreciate the rest.

My apologies for the length, but now you know why so many of the big Hollywood names in film are not in my list. The only one I would put in there in the last 50 years, is Sam Peckinpah, and that one is almost for one film alone, and the best western ever made in my book ... The Wild Bunch! After that it became violence en grace and gratis! I didn't need Dustin Hoffman to tell me why or justify it, either!


Last edited by Moshkito on Thu May 05, 2011 1:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 1:01 pm 
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calvin2hikers wrote:
just plain doug wrote:
calvin2hikers wrote:
1. Lewis, Jerry

2. The rest

I didn't know you were a French person.


Ah yes, the French, the first to recognize the brilliance of Mr. Lewis.


I always thought that part a bit weird, because the French have always been so "intelectual" about everything, but in the end, Jerry was like the ultimate finger to that upper class, and the fact that it was physical was very good, because a lot of the old French anything has been way too staid, stoic and boring. So much so that they like to hide the Marquis the Sade because he was indeed revolutionary, but then, everyone lost their heads in those days regardless of politics! So you can't blame these folks for not saying anything and staying quiet and submissive, which the "jerry lewis" character is the anti-thesis of!

Just realized the bigger impact and suggestion ... Jerry Lewis would be a modern day Moliere for the French ... if he were a writer.


Last edited by Moshkito on Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu May 05, 2011 11:29 pm 
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Moshkito wrote:
Quilt wrote:
Frank was a great musician/composer. In that medium he excelled.
...
Uncle Meat is extremely amateur in the way it is put together. The 'plot'/storyline/narrative/whatever is risible, or at least it was beyond my definition of entertainment. I am a huge Zappa fan but I don't believe everything he put out, some music included, was particularly good, and I refuse to distort my own definition of what is 'good' or 'worthwhile' just so I can appreciate the value of this motion picture/experiment.
...


Agreed.

I probably am one of the very few film reviewers that gave that film a good review, specially at a time when it was kewl to trash it, and say some other Hollywood jackoff film is more valuable or important, simply because it made money and is "famous".

And this creates a problem. Your perception and mine!

If you happen to catch, let's say, 5 or 6 of the early Godard films, where he is vehement about making fun of Hollywood conventions for film, you end up finding one thing. Godard can be annoying as heck, and he is playing with your perception. You and I are so used to seeing this and that, that we can not even compare it to your perception or mine in a similar situation, but you accept Jack Sparrow's or a shot from the daily shows as important because they made this or that person famous, and that show gets used everywhere now.

In the end, the shot of the camera moving from left to right while the two lovers are having their discussion on the bar stools, is annoying as heck ... but you and I would probably be looking elsewhere or talking to someone else, and not give a damn about those two and their conversation anyway, if this was "not" a film!

Likewise, Godard throws music and visuals all over the place on purpose.

You can see more of this in a wonderful film that won an Oscar about cinematographers, called "Visions of Light" ... worth having in your collection, but take a look at what inspires and how it is done sometimes! ...

Now, the issue is ... does anyone do this with music? The answer is NO. On top of it, when you read many of the comments in this board ... there are many people that want the rock Frank and the jazz Frank ... and you and I know that he had an independent streak and this is what Varese and so many others mean to Frank, that means aboslutely nothing and total shit to most of us that even listen to music ... how many of us even have a Varese album? Or can say that we listened to it with a fair ear?

It was a time that allowed for that expression and experimentation ... and that is the most important part of it all ... and many people -- I call them how socialistic of them to think so! to nag at them! -- are not comfortable with the free form stuff, the different stuff, the totally off the wall stuff ... which sometimes includes nothing of meaning on purpose, because we are expecting that kiss to bring the movie audience an OHHHHHHHHHHH to last for 5 minutes so all the girls will come back and see it again!

This was what the whole artistic thing had been about, at least as far as the "surrealists" in 1930's with Bretton, Dali, Bunuel and others, which America did not see a lot of because of the depression. And the 60's, with all its drugs and what not, had a lot of that free form spirit, where sometimes it was more important to get out of the "comfort zone" than it was to see something different.

200 Motels is very good. If anything, it is the real representation of a time that was trying to find its way, and Frank knew that the "commercial" way was not it. But here we are, and compare the work to anything that is/was commercial, and the end result is? ... it will always be bad, because no one gets it and no one knows what it is about.

I look at it, as an attempt to do in film the same thing that he was doing in music ... turn it upside down and see what you got. The only sad thing about it is that most folks, even today, are only interested in the guitar god and they couldn't careless about the composer and the one person in rock music that actually made an effort at doing something else and hoped to come up with something new and something different.

This is my appreciation of Frank ... I couldn't careless for the release of the Roxy stuff or any more of the Overnight stuff, because in the end, all it is doing is glorify the rock hero guy, not the totality of who Frank was. I think the sale of the rock star is limited in time. The sale of the artist and his total work? Forever!

Quote:
...
Maybe you had to be there to get into the spirit of it all.
Best wishes


Not really. There is nothing in that time that you can't have today or not do. With one exception! And it is a major one! Music, then had an independent spirit and it was independent. Today, the only independence is commercialism done with the left index finger instead of the right index finger! And we're way too influenced by the popular music and top ten, to appreciate the rest.

My apologies for the length, but now you know why so many of the big Hollywood names in film are not in my list. The only one I would put in there in the last 50 years, is Sam Peckinpah, and that one is almost for one film alone, and the best western ever made in my book ... The Wild Bunch! After that it became violence en grace and gratis! I didn't need Dustin Hoffman to tell me why or justify it, either!



I appreciate your perspective, and your lengthy response. There may be some truth in what you are saying. I suspect (and this is only my opinion) that one of the reasons that FZ's films are so bad is that theyt were poorly budgeted, and made with relatively poor expertise. Films that stand the test of time tend to be well scripted with a coherent screenplay, rather than a bunch of improvisational self-indulgent nonsense etc

Cheers


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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 1:21 pm 
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Quilt wrote:
...
I appreciate your perspective, and your lengthy response. There may be some truth in what you are saying. I suspect (and this is only my opinion) that one of the reasons that FZ's films are so bad is that theyt were poorly budgeted, and made with relatively poor expertise. Films that stand the test of time tend to be well scripted with a coherent screenplay, rather than a bunch of improvisational self-indulgent nonsense etc

Cheers


I like your reply ....

I made a film 30 years ago for a class at UCSB ... and I got really sick and could not finish it, but I did have the cassette with the soundtrack that I used to CUT the film. And in the party I played that to the class ... and the instructor, who was one of those USC folks from the Lucas camp, said that of all the projects in the class I was the only one that put together something that had an amazing conceptual nature, and was interesting. Everyone else did little living room and outdoor bs'rs and tried to create a "story".

What did I do?

I had 3 pieces of music that were VERY visual for me. I put them together on a cassette, and how I liked them in sequence. The 2nd part was from Kevin Ayers' Dr. Dream album the poem "Once I awakened" ... and then the end piece that had The Doors' with Jim screaming "Has this dream stopped?" ... during the credits.

I filmed it all directly and visually. The opening had a series of sound effects that ended in a car crash, and then this girl's voice in a dreamy vampire film and the girl came out of the woods in her shift with long hair flowing and the wind taking the hair with it ... and the segue into Kevin's piece which I filmed literally and when he says ... get out of my dream ... th eboyfriend across from her is looking around (camera does 360 also) and she's not there ... and I follow the music and during a quick drum break before Mike Oldfield blasts out, I super impose my roomate drummer doing the kick break. During the shoot of this part, I turned the camera up to the sky after the 360 and simply turned around and a plane was going up into the sky ... I stayed on it ... and faded into the credits with Jim's warbling.

Had a scrambling shot in the beginning right after the car crash, where the camera went around our library of 40k books of literature -- a few seconds ... filmed my car scratching the pavement ... went dark in the accident ... and straight into the "dreaming" part ...

I actually never wrote the script down because all I did was take the visuals directly ... with some shots I added ... because I had done them ... when I was driving home from the shoot, I turned the camera on in my hand and moved it around in all directions, which gave a really weird sensation when seeing it ... and I used that in the accident just before the tires squeal ...

Some experiments work. Some don't. Mine was never finished because I got mad at the only person that did not allow me to use the piece of music ... Ray Manzarek!

I don't want to redo the film ... I can still see and hear it and visualize it ... but the woman's face and vision I had, is not there and I have not seen another woman that would fit that ... so I trashed it.

I had no budget.

Cost me 45 dollars to get the two reels of film developed in Seattle (10 bux cheaper than Hollywood!) ... one was Kodakhrome and the other Ektachrome stock. This was 1981, btw ...

All in all, I have not done film since ... but I can tell you that the highest moment I have ever had in my life was when I matched the soundtrack to a film cut exactly how I wanted it ... it was there ... live ... beautiful ...

But what I wanted in film, was ... a letting go ... just flow ... and I already knew from 200 Motels and a couple of other weird films (Zachariah and El Topo and such), that it was impossible to do visionary stuff ... and I have stuck to writing since ... because there is no audience for it, and some folks are simply not willing to just see ... how the other half lives, or as I say ... how your dreams live. Unffortunately for me, I never bothered to learn how to do a guitar solo, hey?

Frank had the makings of something ... but he was involved with the worst possible fuckhead around, that spent his time kissing rock stars ... he should have gotten 3 or 4 folks from UCLA, opr one or 2 from USC, and leave that star kisser behind ... and then learn from his own movies ... but he did do with 200 Motels, what was really impossible to do in film ... turn it all upside down ... and the visual nature? ... one of the biggest and most important things to teach Hollywood, that video could be used to enhance the images and to create other effects ... and this had not been thought of yet at the time, but was obviously inevitable.

Sometimes it takes a lunatic ... he, himself, might not know what is going on ... but you have to give it credit, when it is not your standard 8mm of you and your family! Someone wanted to try something else ... can we tap into that? And not concentrate on our own likes and dislikes? ... that's the challenge and that's where the "art" lives.

Sorry about the long stuff ... I'm not a conceptual person, but instinctively, something comes up ... I can't help it ... it's just there ... and I trust it to be a part of me like everything else. The films Frank did, is about him and his work ... now, the question is, if we're going to allow Frank to live his vision ... instead of putting him in a white room with a guitar ... which I would have immediatly broken against the wall ... and then played!


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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 1:48 pm 
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Lumpy Gravy wrote:
in no particular order
the coen brothers
francis ford coppola
stanley kubrick
ingmar bergman
martin scorsese
david lynch
akira kurosawa
federico fellini
spike lee
peter jackson


exactly with 2 exceptions:
the coen brothers
francis ford coppola
stanley kubrick
ingmar bergman
martin scorsese
david lynch
akira kurosawa
federico fellini
Alfred Hitchcock
Steven Spielberg

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PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2011 7:55 pm 
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Lumpy Gravy wrote:
in no particular order
the coen brothers
francis ford coppola
stanley kubrick
ingmar bergman
martin scorsese
david lynch
akira kurosawa
federico fellini
spike lee
peter jackson
Cletus wrote:
exactly with 2 exceptions:
the coen brothers
francis ford coppola
stanley kubrick
ingmar bergman
martin scorsese
david lynch
akira kurosawa
federico fellini
Alfred Hitchcock
Steven Spielberg
yeah, I should have included hitchcock.
I'll take out peter jackson, and put hitchcock in his place.

spielberg, though... I don't know...
he tends to follow a formula... (he's never really that original)
in my top 25 (maybe).

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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 11:41 am 
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Speilberg over Sergio Leone and Robert Altman?

I think the guy that did Boogie Nights and There Will Be Blood deserves a mention. Paul Thomas Anderson.


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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2011 11:33 pm 
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There are moments of genius in 200 Motels, and long sections of genius in Baby Snakes. I haven't seen all of Uncle Meat, and the bits I have seen are not extremely inspiring. Although I admit to laughing at "He's using the chicken to measure it" line occasionally when listening to the penalty tracks on the CD. Lumpy Gravy is pure genius, to be compared with David Lynch at his most absurd. Thing-Fish has moments of genius, like the films, but it has the same problem of deflation - things build up considerable interest, and then the damn thing just goes on, until it bursts or deflates.

In his films - and less succesful works in general, even parts of CPIII - Zappa tended to use editing as a form of attack, rather than a way of enhancing the material and making the parts larger than the whole. I also think he didn't quite master the art of disrupting continuity in a satisfying manner, a key element of good filmmaking and storytelling in general. But wtf, if he'd been better at logical cutting, we wouldn't have had the totally enthralling mess called Them or Us - The Book.

He was ready to kill his darlings any time, but not always in the right order, methinks.

PS. HJ - there's another Trier in Cannes now. He's Norwegian, and not a Nazi :wink:

PPS. Of course von Trier isn't either, but his Tourette's got the better of him this time 8)

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