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PostPosted: Tue Jun 22, 2010 11:37 pm 
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GG! That link gives to a page I just heard about on the FM dial!
there are three audio samples of 'sound' reproducing data thru soundification no less,
the third of which sounds so much like FZ Synclavier work I can't sit tight and dwell too long
or the times may pile it under with news and made up and the sound will disappear in the motes of tomorrow's forgetful yesterday!

That is: The Third audio clip sounds like FZ in That link that Mr Green Genes gave above. Check it out! You might learn something :shock:
In any event they are likening it to 21st Century Music and it feels like I've heard it before

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Wed Jun 23, 2010 2:32 am 
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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Wed Jun 23, 2010 4:03 pm 
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really or believe
too this day not figherd :? L MY xock OFF

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Wed Mar 23, 2011 8:12 am 
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Zappa... Ahead of his time...

Secret of time travel could be unlocked by the Large Hadron Collider, scientists claim

It's long been the stuff of science fiction fantasy but time travel could be a real possibility say scientists.


Furthermore, they believe the 17-mile-long Large Hadron Collider (LHC) based underground near Geneva holds the key.

The theory is that the world’s biggest atom smasher might be able to unleash the Higgs singlet - a particle that could appear before the collision that produced it.

The mind-boggling theory is that it will have entered from another dimension.

There are a few obstacles in the way, however.

To begin with, scientists aren't even sure that the particle exists – or whether the LHC is capable of creating it.

The Higgs singlet is related to another particle which is also yet to be found, the Higgs boson. This particular particle has been dubbed the 'God particle' and is believed to have been crucial in forming the cosmos after the Big Bang.

Regarding the Higgs singlet, physicists say that finding it could pave the way for messages to be sent both to the past and the future, according to a report in LiveScience.

‘Our theory is a long shot, but it doesn't violate any laws of physics or experimental constraints,’ said physicist Tom Weiler of Vanderbilt University.

Writing on the research website arxiv.org, Mr Weiler and fellow scientist Chui Man Ho explain that if the LHC manages to find the elusive Higgs boson then a Higgs singlet may be produced at the same time.

To prove their theory the team needs the LHC to show evidence of Higgs singlet particles and their decay products appearing at the same.

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If that happens, it means that they will have been produced by particles that have gone back in time - or through another dimension - to pre-date the collision that produced them in the first place.

The theory that allows for the Higgs singlet to jump back and forth in time is called the M Theory.

This holds that we exist in a four-dimensional ‘membrane’ – three dimensions of space and one of time - that floats in a 10 or 11-dimension universe.

All known forces and particles are ‘stuck’ to the 4D membrane, but experts believe that the Higgs singlet is not, and is able to ‘diffuse’ into other dimensions.

‘One of the attractive things about this approach to time travel is that it avoids all the big paradoxes,’ Mr Weiler said.

‘Because time travel is limited to these special particles, it is not possible for a man to travel back in time and murder one of his parents before he himself is born, for example.

'However, if scientists could control the production of Higgs singlets, they might be able to send messages to the past or future.’

In December last year the LHC - which is buried 300ft close to the Swiss-French border - recreated the primordial soup that existed in the galaxy just moments after the Big Bang.

The super-hot 'quark-gluon plasma' is believed to have been the entire cosmos a fraction of a second after the Big Bang 13.7billion years ago.

For the first time, activity of the two elementary particles within the plasma was clearly tracked and a phenomenon called 'jet quenching' was observed, giving hints on how matter evolved into stars, planets and eventually life on Earth.

The results were achieved when lead ions were collided in the LHC at ultra-high energies producing temperatures some 500,000 times hotter than the core of the sun.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1368107/Is-Large-Hadron-Collider-world-s-time-machine.html

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2011 6:26 am 
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Higgs boson range narrows at European collider

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider say a signal that suggested they might have seen "hints" of the long-sought Higgs boson particle has weakened.


New results to be presented this week at a conference in India all but eliminate the mid-range where the Higgs - if it exists - might be found.

Physicists will now search for the boson at lower and higher energy ranges. (read more)

Also in the news:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-14680570

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Sat Aug 27, 2011 7:10 am 
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I found Boss Hogg:
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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Tue Sep 27, 2011 2:50 pm 
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'The God Particle': The Higgs Boson (Approx. 5 min)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_HrQVhgbeo

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2011 2:30 am 
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Large Hadron Collider and the search for the Higgs boson: the moment of truth approaches

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The LHC's detectors detect the decay of particles following a collision. 'Finding the Higgs and nothing else would be unsatisfactory', says one physicist.

The 50-year search for the Higgs boson – the elusive particle that attributes mass to matter – is months from completion. Physics will never be the same

The Large Hadron Collider’s search for the Higgs boson – the theoretical particle that is believed to give all matter in the universe mass – is, according to physicists, entering its last phase. At some point in the next few months, perhaps as soon as December, we will know: either it exists in the form that is predicted, or it does not. Either way, it will have profound implications for our understanding of physics. Why haven’t we found it? And what will it mean when we do – or if we don’t?

Modern particle physics is based around the so-called “Standard Model”, which describes all known subatomic particles and how they interact. The Standard Model explains why certain particles have qualities, such as electromagnetic charge, which distinguish those particles from mere empty space. But why some particles have mass – why heavy things are harder to push – is less clear.

Peter Higgs, a University of Edinburgh physicist, argued in the 1960s that mass was the product of a field which permeates the whole universe, even empty space. The field has a viscous effect on other particles, grabbing at them stickily, making them hard to move: giving them mass. Quantum theory dictates that any field must have an associated particle, in the way that electromagnetism – light – has the photon. For Higgs’s hypothesis to work, a Higgs particle must exist.

Unfortunately, so far, while every other particle predicted by the Standard Model has been detected in experiments, the Higgs remains stubbornly unfound.

Tom Whyntie, a physicist at the LHC, says that this is a real problem for the Standard Model. “We say that it works like this, and this is how mass is generated, but we’ve got no experimental evidence for it whatsoever. And that really is a deal-breaker on how we think matter works at the fundamental level.”

That is where particle accelerators such as the LHC come in. By smashing particles together at high speeds, new particles are created, according to how much energy the collision contains: mass and energy are the same thing, as in Einstein’s equation E=mc². It is not known what the mass of the Higgs is, but if two particles smash together at the right speed, it will be created, and its brief existence and decay can be recorded in the LHC’s detectors. So all the LHC team have to do is smash together particles at all the mass-energy levels that the Higgs could theoretically be, and it will be found.

Except, as Whyntie points out, it’s not as simple as that. “Smashing together protons is a mess,” he says. Each proton is made up of three smaller particles called quarks, and you never know quite what the energy of the two quarks in any particular collision will be. Earlier, lower-energy colliders used smaller, elementary particles, allowing for precision, but they were limited in power, and soon reached their upper limit without finding the Higgs. “The LHC is more powerful but messier – it’s the difference between a sniper rifle and a shotgun,” says Whyntie.

This messiness makes the search for the Higgs a more complicated procedure. Each result the LHC finds has to be examined carefully and repeated, to ensure that nothing was missed. Even so, during the relatively short time the accelerator has been working, it has searched a large swath of the area that the Higgs might have been found in.
The energy of the LHC’s collisions – and therefore the mass of the Higgs that will hopefully be created – is measured in gigaelectronvolts (GeV). Earlier colliders ruled out a Higgs with a mass below 114GeV. The LHC has ruled out one between 135 and 500GeV.

Prof John Ellis, a Cern physicist who has been involved in the search for the Higgs for nearly four decades, says that whatever the LHC finds, physics will need some significant rewriting. “The fact that we have not yet found the Higgs is a fantastic success for the Standard Model,” he says. “The region that remains to be explored [between 114 and 135GeV] is precisely the region where, according to the Standard Model, we would expect the Higgs to be. But what the LHC has shown so far is that there must be physics beyond the Standard Model.”

There are three scenarios, he says. “Either the Higgs weighs less than 135, or it weighs more than 500, or between those two figures there is something that is not the Higgs.” All three scenarios lead to difficult questions.

If it’s a heavy Higgs, says Prof Ellis, not only would it fail to match data established elsewhere, the theory would also break down at high energies. “You’d need to find some way of accommodating that, so you’d need new physics,” he says. And if nothing like the Higgs is found, or if it’s something slightly Higgs-like in the medium range, “we know it cannot be a Standard Model Higgs, so there must be some new ingredient, at the minimum, to make a sensible theory”.

Even finding the Higgs exactly where we expect it to be will not be the end of the matter. “It would be a victory for the Standard Model, but that victory comes at a price,” says Prof Ellis. At high energies, the light Higgs leads, according to current understanding, to another breakdown of the theory. Again, new physics would be required to repair it.

Whyntie agrees: “Finding the Higgs and nothing else would be unsatisfactory,” he says. “To make the equations work, you have to do some really dodgy accounting.”

A possible theoretical solution would be “supersymmetry”, a model in which every particle has a so-called “superparticle” partner, which would help the maths make more sense. But, so far, there is no evidence to support it.

The really interesting questions, though, will arise if no Higgs is found at all. While the Higgs has dominated thinking for decades – so much, says Whyntie, that it may be “unhealthy for science; a sort of Cult of Higgs” – alternative theories do exist. One involves a “composite Higgs”, with two smaller particles doing the job of the previously theorised one.

Another draws on string theory, positing a universe with more dimensions of space than our usual three, and with particles “wrapping themselves around” those dimensions and leaking energy into them. In it, there would be no Higgs-like particle at all, just particles behaving differently depending on where they are in these exotic dimensions.

Whatever happens, it’s an extraordinary time to be a particle physicist, says Prof Ellis. “I wrote my first paper on the Higgs in 1975, so it’s been a while. But finally, we’re going to get closure. Either we’re going to find it, or we’re going to prove it doesn’t exist. One way or another, we’ll have an answer.”

Perhaps surprisingly, despite having looked for the Higgs himself for so long, he hopes they don’t find it – the really dramatic breakthroughs will come if the conventional wisdom is proved to be wrong. “The most exciting possibility is that the Higgs doesn’t exist. But sometimes in physics there are results which are just too exciting, too incredible to believe.”

He points to last week’s apparent finding, also at Cern, of faster-than-light neutrinos, as an example of such an unlikely result. “Likewise with Higgs. It would be great if we don’t find it. But it’s more likely that we’ll find it where we thought it would be.”

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/tomchiversscience/100107332/large-hadron-collider-and-the-search-for-the-higgs-boson-the-moment-of-truth-approaches/

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 10:13 am 
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Higgs boson: Physicists close in on the 'God particle'

At a seminar at CERN in Geneva Tuesday, two groups using independent means for seeking the Higgs boson reported seeing tantalizing hints of the presence of the 'God particle.'

In the search for what some have dubbed the "God particle," physicists have gotten a whiff of something interesting, but they aren't close to claiming discovery yet.

The quarry: the Higgs boson, a subatomic particle associated with a universal field permeating space that imparts mass to other particles as they encounter it.

At a two-hour seminar at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva Tuesday, two groups using independent means for seeking the Higgs boson reported seeing tantalizing hints of the Higgs' presence.

But the data were barely distinguishable from the signals one could expect from random noise.

"What we see right now is in agreement with what you would expect if there is a Higgs, or if there is not – the data are in agreement with both at this point," says Pauline Gagnon, a senior research physicist with the University of Indiana at Bloomington and currently at CERN.

Yet both groups saw their faint signals in multiple channels their detectors cover and within the same narrow range of masses.

"That's where it becomes interesting," Dr. Gagnon says.

It's as though two breeds of hunting dogs caught the same faint scent, just enough to send them baying down the same trail.

The Higgs field represents an explanation to a problem that has bedeviled physicists for some 50 years, notes Boston University physicist Lawrence Sulak: how particles acquire mass.

"The proton is 2,000 times heavier than an electron" he explains. "No one has the slightest idea why."

Until the particle is discovered, the Higgs-field explanation remains largely theoretical. Other groups have tried to find the Higgs boson using less-powerful particle accelerators than the one researchers are using at CERN.

Those efforts succeeded in reducing the range of masses one could expect the Higgs boson to exhibit. But no one has yet had the Eureka! moment.

That narrowing of the hunting ground led CERN's director-general Rolf-Dieter Heuer to declare, "The window on the Higgs mass gets smaller and smaller."

The two teams' data were gathered at CERN's Large Hadron Collier, a circular proton collider designed to accelerate bunches of protons in opposite directions to nearly the speed of light.

Once the bunches are accelerated to the very high energies, they are magnetically steered toward collisions within the hearts of massive detectors. From the subatomic collision debris the detectors track, physicists can reconstruct far heftier particles the collisions fleetingly create.

Gagnon notes that the type of Higgs boson physicists are first seeking – the one for which they may have seen hints as reported Tuesday – is only one of several possible versions of the Higgs boson.

The target of the current search is associated with the Higgs field, a mechanism three independent groups of physicists proposed in the 1960s to resolve a discrepancy between the predicted masses of two other types of bosons and their measured masses. Theory said 0. Detection and measurements said "heavy."

The Higgs mechanism and its associated boson are named for one of the physicists proposing the phenomenon, Peter Higgs.

But the Higgs boson that was the subject of Tuesday's seminar is the version associated with the so-called standard model – a description of three groups of fundamental particles, their traits, and their interactions.

Newer theories, such as supersymmetry, attempt to move beyond the standard model and posit an additional four forms of the Higgs boson, all heavier than the one tied to the standard model, Gangon says.

So even if the evidence for a standard-model Higgs turns out to be ephemeral, there may be heavier versions left to hunt.

Based on Tuesday's results and the better-than-advertised performance of the Large Hadron Collier, however, some researchers say with more collisions from CERN's 17-mile-circumference collider during 2012, enough evidence to claim discovery could well accumulate.

The hints reported Tuesday "could turn into proof beyond a doubt come next October," writes Dr. Sulak in an email exchange.

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http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2011/1213/Higgs-boson-Physicists-close-in-on-the-God-particle

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 4:01 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2011 4:30 pm 
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In the spirits of honorable forum member jimie_d

Nice one :smurf:

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2012 2:45 am 
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Higgs boson-like particle discovery claimed at LHC

Scientists in Europe claim they have discovered a new particle consistent with the long-sought Higgs boson.

Cern scientists reporting from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have claimed the discovery of a new particle consistent with the Higgs boson.

The particle has been the subject of a 45-year hunt to explain how matter attains its mass.

Both of the Higgs boson-hunting experiments at the LHC see a level of certainty in their data worthy of a "discovery".

More work will be needed to be certain that what they see is a Higgs, however.

The results announced at Cern (European Organization for Nuclear Research), home of the LHC in Geneva, were met with loud applause and cheering.

Prof Peter Higgs, after whom the particle is named, wiped a tear from his eye as the teams finished their presentations in the Cern auditorium.

"I would like to add my congratulations to everyone involved in this achievement," he added later.

"It's really an incredible thing that it's happened in my lifetime."

The CMS team claimed they had seen a "bump" in their data corresponding to a particle weighing in at 125.3 gigaelectronvolts (GeV) - about 133 times heavier than the proton at the heart of every atom.

They claimed that by combining two data sets, they had attained a confidence level just at the "five-sigma" point*** - about a one-in-3.5 million chance that the signal they see would appear if there were no Higgs particle. (...)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-18702455

...a sub-atomic step for neutron, a cosmic step for mankind... - MGG

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Found!


***
    *Particle physics has an accepted definition for a discovery: a "five-sigma" (or five standard-deviation) level of certainty

    *The number of sigmas measures how unlikely it is to get a certain experimental result as a matter of chance rather than due to a real effect

    *Similarly, tossing a coin and getting a number of heads in a row may just be chance, rather than a sign of a "loaded" coin

    *A "three-sigma" level represents about the same likelihood as tossing eight heads in a row

    *Five sigma, on the other hand, would correspond to tossing more than 20 in a row

    *Independent confirmation by other experiments turns five-sigma findings into accepted discoveries


MGG's reflection: What now? How one is able to independently confirm an experiment made with such a huge toy?

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2012 6:09 am 
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The particle survives for less than a second. They need it to exist so that their theories will be valid. It will take many years for the discovery to be considered actual. If it does exist, they will find it time and time again.

It doesn't mean there's a god. There's just a vital particle that makes things work...or so they say.


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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Wed Jul 04, 2012 6:28 am 
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Of course, there are those that doubt the Big Bang...

Michael Rivero, this morning:

"All we need is just a teeensy bit more money; a few billion only, and we will prove God exists!"

I guess the banks aren't the only part of Europe filled with fraud!

About 2300 years ago there was this very clever fellow named Aristotle. He had a lot of good ideas but he occasionally made a mistake. One mistake Aristotle made was in assuming that since objects thrown straight up into the air came right back down into your hand, that the Earth was standing still and all other parts of the universe were centered on the unmoving Earth. Christians seized on the Earth-centered universe as proof that God sat up nights to admire humans. The church enforced adherence to Aristotelian dogma and tortured anyone who whispered about things like retrograde motion. The people stayed ignorant, the church grew wealthy, and altar boys kept the clergy warm and cozy at night. Then Issac Newton came along and explained just how Aristotle screwed up, and the clergy, even as they continued cuddling the altar boys, grudgingly conceded that the Earth was not the center of the universe, and indeed as ever-larger telescopes proved, was a rather tiny footnote in an ordinary just-one-of-quintillions galaxy.

Then in 1929, Edwin Hubble discovered the Red Shift. Now, Hubble himself did not claim that the red shift showed an expanding universe. That "leap of faith" came from a Catholic Monk named Georges Lema'tre who assumed that the red shift could only be from relative motion, that the universe was expanding, that if you ran the clock back there had to be a supreme moment of creation called the "Big Bang" which means God was even cooler than the Renaissance Popes said he was, yadda yadda, and by the way, Altar Boy, come up to the observatory tonight and I'll show you a surprise! Of course, just as those renaissance popes had to deal with Galileo, fans of Lema'tre had to deal with Albert Einstein who in 1915 published his General Theory of Relativity, which introduced the idea of a black hole; objects of such mass that even light could not escape from their gravity fields. Religiously deranged "scientists", certain they were going to burn in hell for all eternity if they failed to explain away the Lema'tre/Einstein paradox, eventually settled on the idea that "somehow" (interpreted as divine supernatural thingamies) the universe exploding forth from the Big Bang had no mass at all, and hence no gravity field to suck it back into what would have been the baddest black hole of all time. Matter as we know it did not come into existence until much later when two types of Big Bang Matter (or "Batter") mixed together to create both structure and mass. Kind of like the two tubes you use in epoxy cement. And one of those two tubes of "Batter" is named the Higgs Boson.

Nobody has found it yet, and particle physicists keep building larger and larger (and ever more costly) accelerators to prove it exists, and by extension, that the Big Bang and Mount Olympus, Valhalla, Elysium, and the Pearly Gates are all real. The LHC at CERN is just another pyramid or Stonehenge; a machine built to communicate directly with the gods, built using the best technology available at the time.

I will grant that given enough money and electrical power, something may eventually pop out of the LHC that looks close enough to the theoretical Higgs Boson to make Pope Benny the Rat dance the happy dance, but that will not actually prove that the particle ever existed before that moment. And here is why. Particle physicists like to explain the basic principle of how a collider works as slamming two mechanical clocks together and then deducing the structure of the clock from the gears and springs that fly out. Yet common sense suggests that if the clocks are slammed together hard enough (and we are talking near light speed at the LHC) that individual teeth may be broken off from the gears and appear as distinct parts emerging from the collision, yet we know they were not separate and distinct parts within the original clock. In other words, those tiny bits of quanta flying out of the LHC might not be part of the natural world at all, but creations of the scientists themselves and irrelevant to the discussion of whether the universe had a divine beginning or not.

THE BIG BANG IS JUST RELIGION DISGUISED AS SCIENCE

http://whatreallyhappened.com/WRHARTICLES/bang.php


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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 3:11 am 
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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 5:07 am 
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I must have dozed off in class. Sorry sir. Seems I missed the bit where god got mixed up with physics. :?:

I do remember when god got mixed up with evolution and suddenly we had 'intelligent design' as an educational cop-out. Just makes me think of 'military intelligence' or 'business ethics' or 'honest lawyer'.

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 12:13 pm 
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What a waste of money, Boson Higgs can be found most Saturdays around high tide at the Evans Bay sea scouts club rooms.


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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 1:20 pm 
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Fuck it Higgis Boson will only go bang or boom fuck all new just wasting money and go back in time :| dUMB FUCKS 8)

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 1:43 pm 
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Cleon gargles haggis boson. You'd talk funny, too, if that's all you could find in the fridge.


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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 1:45 pm 
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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 2:00 pm 
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[quote="Mr_Green_Genes"][/quote]You git nothing too say it loud though Asshole 8)

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 2:12 pm 
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These are the things we should be spending money on... :smoke:


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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 2:30 pm 
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What a fucking Asshole quote plook too dumb for sense :wink:

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 Post subject: Re: Finding Higgs Boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 4:01 pm 
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We are here to evolve and that is done through science, it is the Human mission, if we were not wasting all of our time and money on crap that means absolutely nothing in the scheme of the Universe we would be off this planet and have out post that would insure the continuation of our species. That is the human mission survival, it is built into our being, when your body senses danger your fight or flight kicks in whether you like it or not. That is what fear is, it is very exciting and why people like the so called extreme sports. We are meant to find a way off this rock and we are wasting all of our precious time and energy and mundane bullshit...disgusting species we are...


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 Post subject: re: finding higgs boson
PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2012 4:25 pm 
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Joined: Sun Feb 16, 2003 7:29 pm
Posts: 9601
higgs wifty
higg leg emma
higgs bossonova in 3/4
higgs biz

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