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 Post subject: The Mike Keneally Albums
PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 9:53 am 
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What do you guys think of his music? He has some wonderful stuff -- the hat. album is very much up my alley, with the crazy WOIIFTM / A Wizard, A True Star-like structure. And I really love what I've heard from the album Dog -- really intelligent, melodic hard rock, with some great experimental sounds too. And as a major XTC fan, the Andy Partridge collaboration album Wing Beat Fantastic is also a favorite. :)


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 10:40 am 
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There are other MK threads, but imo, more is better. We don't talk about MK nearly enough around here. I get the idea that maybe people respect him more than they like his music.
I've seen him live once and it was great. Most of his albums take a few listens to get used to. My go-to MK is Pride is a Sin.
A friend of mine just saw him on the Satriani tour. I would have gone just to see MK, but having to sit through all that Satriani seemed a bit much. I'd like to see him in Dethklok, maybe next time.
FZ fans should know about his various versions of Inca Roads. Take yer pick:
https://www.google.com/#q=mike+keneally+inca+roads

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 11:31 am 
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Check him out on Zappa's Universe VHS The fucker was amazing.
I bought Hat like it after seeing ad in Guitar Player Mag never seen him on the music shop selves after :?

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 3:22 pm 
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I am a big MK fan. His songs are often unpredictable and full of interesting turns, and just when you start thinking it's hard to listen to he rips off a solo that just kills you. He loves the groove. I wish he'd come to my town sometime with the full MK band.....

I like Beer for Dolphins, both live albums, and well, just about all of it.

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 10, 2013 7:07 pm 
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MK is great. I saw him and his band in this tiny music store near Redding, CA a couple of years ago. There were maybe 20 other people in the audience and I was sitting in a chair about 6 feet in front of Mike. Amazing! He played a very similar show to what's on the Bakin' at the Potato cd/dvd. BATP is not a bad place to start for the newcomer either. Why more people aren't clued into this guy I don't know. Now, he's definitely not an easy listen but fans in the post Zappa era who are looking for something new and continually evolving should check him out.


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 7:17 am 
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I love Keneally. His orchestral album with the Metropole Orkest is the shit! I love the Dancing album as well as Guitar Therapy Live.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 2:13 pm 
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Mike keneally your Quimby dollars at work/I can't stop
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMTlDRFcZ5Y

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2016 9:26 am 
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MK has spewed several emails lately about his new albums. I haven't digested em all yet, or even got the new albums yet, so I thought I'd copy the stuff here before it disappears into the canyons of my mind.

KENEALLY REVEALS SCAMBOT 2 SONG SECRETS!

Hey Ms. and Mr. Everyone!

Hello from my bunk in a bus on its way from Copenhagen to Oslo...

I'm very grateful for the first wave of listener response to Scambot 2, which has been heartwarming; really gratifying reactions from the people who've heard the advance download they got after ordering the 2-CD special edition.

Thank you to all of you who've had good words about the album so far!

I want to shine some light on Mike Harris, who engineered the majority of the recordings and who mixed all the songs on both Scambot 2 and Inkling. He really demonstrated angelic patience while I worked on multiple versions of some tracks, got microscopically obsessed with mix details, and re-recorded vocals after re-writing lyrics. Mike achieved a really warm sound, and the many layers don't overwhelm the ear – I've never enjoyed the sound of any of my albums as much as I enjoy this. And more light must shine on Scott Chatfield, who supported the entire undertaking in every way, with great patience and understanding as the songs took shape in his home, over a very lengthy gestation period.

I'm going to deal with the songs on Scambot 2 in order, over the next few Keneallists...

In the Trees

The first song is "In The Trees," which is the craziest song on the album – it was intentional, from a narrative/musical perspective, to start the album at maximum density and then gradually let more oxygen into the sound as the album progresses.

The skeleton of "In The Trees" is the main rhythm guitar part, played on a Fender Baritone. The opening melody came to me while standing next to a row of shopping carts in a soul-deadening department store, and I stood singing it into my phone whilst my girlfriend patiently waited for me to grab a cart and start shopping for sundries.

Months later I woke up too early with ideas for the next lick to follow that opening line. I snuck out to the living room with the guitar and phone and ended up recording something like 20 little instrumental segments, which I later took into the studio with Mike Harris and formed into the basis of the whole ten-and-a-half-minute epic.

My daughter Jesse and Ben Thomas helped me out vocally on this one, the one song on the album which is most explicit about vocalizing the different characters. I didn't want to have each song sound as though it was sung by the different characters (that would be more of a "rock opera" album than I cared to make) but for the dramatic, over-the-top nature of this song, it made sense.

Kris Myers recorded the drums for this song, as well as "Sam," "Buzz," "Constructed" and "Freezer Burn" (PLUS "Falafel," "Tom" and "Back It Up!" off of Inkling, the second album in the 2-CD special edition) in one single-day marathon recording session at Transient Sound in Chicago. Truly a super-human feat of endurance and skill. We recorded Pete Griffin's bass in his bedroom. This album encompassed a lot of locations and times and it was some work making it all sound cohesive – the Mike Harris magic at work.

Roots Twist

"Roots Twist" is one you might remember from a video we posted over two years ago of us recording the vocal parts in the living room. It sounded cool then, but really bloomed into awesomeness for me once we recorded Bryan Beller's bass and Joe Travers' drums for it last year. The rhythm section KILLS on this song. If we were releasing singles from the album, this would be the first one.

This one was also built from the guitar part up, and I wrote the part standing next to Mike Harris in the studio, section by section. I knew that I needed a song that felt like this one, but didn't know yet what the actual notes would be – it was fun coming up with the parts on the spot and having Mike H. capture them for me, listening back and deciding what the next part should sound like, and by the time I was done composing the structure, the main rhythm guitar part was already recorded. It's a fun way to write, and one that I employed for many songs on this album.

Sam

"Sam," on the other hand, was a fully composed piece prior to me bringing it into the studio, and it was based on a guitar chord shape I'd never happened upon before (if you'll permit me to get tech for a sec, it involves playing a triad with the 5th note of the scale on the fifth string, the 3rd on the third string, and the 1st on the first string – i.e., the first chord of the song, G major, has the D on the 5th fret of the A string, the B on the 4th fret of the G string, and the G on the third fret of the high E). That was a starting point, and then finding a second different but complementary chord shape, and moving that around the neck, very quickly gave me a chord progression I found really complete-sounding and pleasing, and somehow wistful enough to support a lyric about Ophunji actually displaying evidence of humanity (so to speak).

The guitar part in the chorus is obviously me channeling my inner Neil Young. And the guitar solo is a bit of a Coltrane injection, so if you recall the song "Wooden Smoke" which alludes to both of those titans, this song is kind of a musical reference back to that. I think Kris Myers initially thought I was insane when he heard how I chose to layer two different drum takes in the guitar solo in order to achieve a seriously undulating rhythmic ebb and flow for the guitar solo to float over, but over time he began to understand the method in my madness (I think. I hope).

Next Keneallist I'll deal with "side two" (speaking of which – when we asked you to take that survey about formats a while back, very few of you showed a specific interest in vinyl for this release, so initially at least, we're not doing vinyl. If the album seems to catch on with people in its 2-CD and download formats, we may revisit the idea of vinyl. We do really love vinyl and still have fantasies of releasing my music that way, but we've got to be sensible about it).

In closing I want to say a couple of things about the artwork – first off, the Scambot figurine on the cover was constructed by Dane Runyon, a musician/composer of wond'rous gifts whose debut album Looking Below () I produced. He gifted me figurines of Scambot and Ophunji. Scott photographed the Scambot figurine in the kitchen, and then Atticus Wolrab placed it, through the magic of art, into its present fantasy environment. Many thanks to you, Dane, for your gift, and for your contribution to what is my favorite album cover of any we've released.

And re: Atticus, who refuses to take art credits on my albums anymore, for reasons; he can't stop me from talking about him here. He's once again done stellar work with this album. And in addition to all the design work and his manipulation of my goofy drawings in the booklet, he also did the drawing which occupies page two of the digital booklet, a radical reimagining of my characters in an explosion of Aoxomoxoa-tude. I love it, and need to thank him openly for it whether he likes it or not.

Enough words for now? Sure!

The exclusive Scambot 2 Exowax Pre-Order

But once again to recap, for those who haven't ordered the album – we're currently taking pre-orders for the 2-CD Scambot 2 signed, limited edition of 2000. These will be shipped in late July (after I get back from this Satriani European tour and can actually sign the ding-dang things). They consist of the Scambot 2 album (65 minutes of music) and the Inkling album (48 minutes of music) in a handsome digi-pak with two booklets. You'll get an immediate download of Scambot 2 as soon as you pre-order. (You'll have to wait until your CD set arrives to hear Inkling.)

Scambot 2 itself will be available as a single-album paid download in late July. (Inkling won't be available as a download – it's only available as part of the 2-CD set.)

For the moment, the music is only available through Exowax. It will go into wider release through other distributors and retailers starting September 9.

Thanks all d:9)

Mike

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2016 9:28 am 
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KENEALLY'S SCAMBOT 2 SONG DIARY, SIDE TWO!

Hello all – I'm back on the bus, right now in the midst of an 18-hour drive to Gijon, Spain, on the heels of four G3 performances in Italy featuring Satriani, Vai and the Aristocrats. There are eight more shows on this tour, including another three G3 bills in Germany. This is continuing to be a very enjoyable European adventure indeed. The camaraderie is slamming (I wonder if anyone has ever utilized that phrase before) and the music and audiences every night are a thrill. Is my favorite part of the tour curling up in the bus bunk at night, strapping on the headphones and hitting "shuffle" on my seven-hour playlist of Radiohead B-sides and non-album tracks? Well, it might be tied for first.

As I mentioned last time, I'm going to take a look at the virtual "side two" of Scambot 2 [now available for exclusive pre-order] – "Clipper," "Forget About It," "Pretzels" and "Buzz." The prog side. A 14-minute side, for maximum fidelity should it ever hit vinyl (just like side two of English Settlement if I remember correctly).

Clipper

Why is "Clipper" called "Clipper"? Well, a lot of the songs were named before they had lyrics – when we'd start a new session, Mike Harris would ask me what the song was called, and very often there would be no name for it so I'd have to make one up on the spot. In this case I was thinking nautical, because I knew the Quiet Children were going to be in their yacht in this song, and the word "Clipper" came to me as a good working title, but one I expected to change somewhere down the line. Which of course hardly ever happens – nine times out of ten, working titles stick to a song and refuse to be displaced. This song is simply "Clipper" whether it makes sense or not.

(Actually, I later made "Clipper" the name of Campland Standish's engineer on his radio show…for the little excerpt from the Standish show heard in this song, I originally recorded a bit more material, and the part right after Campland says "It's a Monday" had him saying "Clipper, can you turn up my headphones please?"

But when I played a rough mix of this song for Sarah Crochet, she suggested that it would be better to cut the radio show right after "It's a Monday," which worked hugely better with the music in that spot, and also conveyed more than enough of the vibe of the radio show without overegging the pudding, as people who say things like that would say. Sarah was outlandishly helpful to me all the way down the line in suggesting things to improve the mixes as they were in progress, as well as the final sequence of songs, which I'd probably still be trying to figure out now if it weren't for her help. I'm especially grateful to her in the case of "It's a Monday," which delighted Bryan Beller to no end first time he heard it and resulted in "It's a Monday" becoming a running gag between us for a few weeks.)

Doug Lunn and Gregg Bendian played the bass and drums for "Clipper," recorded at Chatfield Manor. We were rehearsing at Scott's for some Southern California Keneally/Bendian/Lunn dates, and I took the opportunity to record them for this song (as well as "Pretzels" and "Scores Of People"). I'm terribly glad to have Doug's unique fretless bass tone on one of my records again for the first time since Boil That Dust Speck. And it's a real privilege to hear Gregg's compositional approach to drums and percussion applied to my music. This song has a very episodic feel, moving through wildly varied landscapes, and I knew these two were the ones to help me construct the skeleton for it.

Another important building block for this song and album were the two days Mike Harris and I spent at the studio of Jeff Berkley, brilliant San Diego guitarist/percussionist, taking advantage of his boundless collection of guitars and amplifiers. I'm the worst interview subject in the world for guitar magazines because I can never remember what gear I used for what songs, and that's amplified (so to speak) ten-fold in the case of this record, because I was picking up different instruments all over the place and recording bits with them, and all details would be wiped from my memory as I moved on to the next thing. But I do clearly recall using Jeff's six-string banjo (tuned like a guitar) for this particular song. It was a texture I've long wanted to get on one of my records.

I was very happy to get my daughter Jesse singing on this tune; in particular the sound of her crystal-clear voice, layered into a choir and delivering the line "You suck," is very pleasing.

The outro has a vibe that Scott Chatfield had previously mentioned to me as being hypnotic and worthy of preserving in its pure form (when I was wondering if it needed additional melodies, vocals, a solo or something), and I wasn't sure whether or not I should fade it out or let it continue to hypnotize until it stopped cold, but ultimately it worked best for me in the context of the record to have it fade away. And then J.D. Mack asked on Facebook if this is the first song on one of my records to actually fade to complete silence. Wow, is it? I can't think of another one. That's kind of amazing to me. (The original "Egg Zooming" mix comes close but doesn't get all the way there.) Only took me 23 years to have a good old-fashioned fade-out.

Forget About It

"Forget About It" is the sort of thing which feels so peculiar to me, makes me practically wonder if it's irresponsible to do, it's so idiosyncratic and odd (other songs in this category include "Eno And The Actor" and "I Guess I'll Peanut"), but it makes me so happy to hear. I love Evan Francis' saxes and flutes on this, which I recorded in the back room of the condo Sarah and I used to live in. Evan couldn't play too loudly because we didn't want to freak out the neighbors too badly, and I really enjoy the subdued tone of his playing here. My friend, the brilliant keyboardist/composer Matt Mitchell, says he hears something of the Uncle Meat album in the brief use of harpsichord on this track. Not intentional, but yep, can't deny the influence – I adore the way keyboards and woodwinds were arranged on UM and I imagine there are a lot of accidental echoes of it in my stuff through the years.

Pretzels

"Pretzels" (and the following track "Buzz") are where the Gentle Giant influence comes on strong in this album, possibly stronger than they ever have before in my stuff. On "Pretzels" it's in the main vocal melody and timbre, which absolutely nod towards Kerry Minnear, and on "Buzz" it's in the interlocking architecture of the instruments in the verses and the use of clavinet. It would be impossible to overstate how much I respect Kerry Minnear's work, and how much I love the music that he and Gentle Giant created.

"Pretzels" probably went through more re-workings and remixes than any other song on the album. At one point it had an entirely different lyric and vocal melody, and large swaths of additional background vocals. But it's such an intricate piece and I needed to not layer on so much stuff; I had to keep reminding myself of my stated desire to have this album be less dense and demandingly abstract than Scambot 1 was. Scott Chatfield mentioned to me, while he was listening to the album come together in his home, that he really couldn't see that this album was any less crazy and jam-packed with information than the first one had been, and I vowed internally to keep an eye on that while working through all these ideas and textures that were driving me forward. Once I stripped away the original lyrics and melody for "Pretzels" and went with a new melody that simply echoed already existing aspects of the layered piano parts underneath, it smoothed out the song a lot.

Of course I made things tough by needing to hear a guitar solo over the middle section of this tune, which is a crazy tower built out of multiple guitar, keyboard and vocal overdubs. Again I can't overstate the amazing work Mike Harris has done with the mixes on this album. He made it all work together beautifully and the final mix is pure honey to my ears.

You can hear "Pretzels" starting to come together in its very early stages in this "making-of" video we posted a couple of years ago.

Buzz

"Buzz" was the song that resulted in the most traumatic crisis of confidence during the making of the album. I was listening to a VERY early rough mix of the song while driving home from working on it, basically consisting of nothing but clavinet and click track, and became convinced that there was nothing of value in it, and that possibly the whole album was equally valueless. This is what you call poor perspective: I was just overworked and needed a few days off. Now I get a huge kick out of the groove of this song, and it's one I especially gravitate toward for headphone listening. Pete Griffin and Kris Myers sound especially huge on it. Kris does magical things on the drums on this song; subtle but so satisfying. I presented him with my fake drum tracks (drum patches played manually on a keyboard) as guides for the tracks he recorded on his own in Chicago, and gave him carte blanche to go off and try whatever he liked, but his general approach was to stick pretty close to what I had done on the demos rhythmically, but obviously make them sound like a real drummer, with soul and grit and a million beautiful embellishments. I could listen to just the drums on this song and have a fine old time forever.

The music underneath the part that goes "Who are you wearing? Who are you wearing?" was actually the first music written for this song, but I knew as I was writing it that it wasn't meant to be the beginning of "Buzz." I recorded it with Mike Harris then had him put it aside as we worked on the rest of the piece, while I continually wondered where that initial chunk was eventually going to fit in. I remember the feeling when I finally got to the part of the song where I thought that section would work, and I asked Mike to drop it back in – ahhhh. Listening to that fitting together was a highlight of the album-making process for me, like pushing in the last piece of a jigsaw puzzle.

NOTE! AN IMPORTANT NOTE!

This won't be relevant until you actually get the physical 2-CD set containing the booklet for the Inkling album, but I need to start atoning and spreading the word about this now: there's a song on Inkling called "Cram" which I am REALLY happy with, and which found its way on and off the main Scambot 2 listing multiple times until I finally decided that the main album flowed better without it. "Cram" is now a major highlight of Inkling, and it arose out of a session with Rick Musallam and Kris Myers which also resulted in the song "Roll" on Scambot 2 (which I'll get to in the next Keneallist).

Anyway, I'm mentioning this because I've just realized that I forgot to list Rick Musallam in the credits for "Cram" in the Inkling booklet, which is already printed. Arrrrrgggghhh. This is really galling…I spent hours proofreading these things and yet it repeatedly eluded me. It's just a dumb oversight from my original Word document, and it's especially upsetting because Rick played so beautifully on the track. I will continue to beat myself up in public over this because I really want people to know Rick is on "Cram." Heartfelt apologies to Rick, and to all of you, because this is going to get tiresome, I know it.

The exclusive Scambot 2 Exowax Pre-Order

Again, in case you haven't already received this memo: we're currently taking pre-orders for the 2-CD Scambot 2 signed, limited edition of 2000. These will be shipped in late July (at this writing there are eight more shows on this Satriani European tour; then I'll come home, rest for a moment, and get to signing the CD-sets, which have just been shipped to Scott's place). The double-CD set consists of the Scambot 2 album (65 minutes of music) and the Inkling album (48 minutes of music) in a handsome digi-pak with two booklets. You'll get an immediate download of Scambot 2 as soon as you pre-order. (You'll have to wait until your CD set arrives to hear Inkling, which incidentally features Rick Musallam on the song "Cram.")

Scambot 2 itself will be available as a single-album paid download in late July. (Inkling won't be available as a download - it's only available as part of the 2-CD set.)

For the moment, the music is only available through Exowax. It will go into wider release through other distributors and retailers starting September 9.

More soon – thank you everyone!
Mike

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2016 9:30 am 
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SIDE THREE OF KENEALLY'S SCAMBOT 2 SONG DIARY!

Hi! I'm flying home from the Satriani tour right now. This has been perhaps the most enjoyable Joe tour yet. We had some 2 1/2-hour shows with intermission and some 2-hour shows with no intermission. Seven shows were G3 shows with Steve Vai and The Aristocrats, where I sang Police and Nirvana songs during the jam (seriously fun). We had festival shows of various lengths – Hellfest in Nantes and the Lasko Beer and Flowers festival in Slovenia being particularly enjoyable. It was just an extremely fun tour! And once again, everyone on the band and crew (as well as all the Vai and Aristocrats people) were glorious road-rat humans of endless capability and good humor. Cheers to every freaking one of them! And to every freaking one of you who came to a show, or several.

Now I'm very much looking forward to relaxing at home for a couple of days, and then I'll be signing and numbering huge stacks of Scambot 2 CD sets so that we can start shipping them to you.

I'm doggone grateful for the tremendous response to the Scambot 2 download (which comes your way immediately upon ordering the physical product). I appreciate all the good words with great fervor! (Steve Vai wrote me the nicest email with his feelings about each song on the album. It means so much to me.)

Shipping will begin soon, and I'm excited that people are about to hear the second album in the 2-CD package, Inkling. It really does have a character of its own.

Now I'll continue yammering a bit about the songs on Scambot 2, as I've been doing for the last two Keneallists. Let's take a look at "side three," shall we? Yes! Let's! Take a look!

Race the Stars

This is pop! Super pop. Pop as heck. (Well '70s pop, anyway.)

The chord progression was written on Scott's piano. I captured chunks of the progression on my phone as I was writing them, and it originally went under the working title "Fogerty," simply because I had been listening to a lot of Creedence in the car at that time, and not because I thought the song was especially Fogerty-y, musically. It was just a name that came to mind.

As I've said, working titles often have a way of sticking – and while in this case, the title "Fogerty" didn't make it to the final draft, it did have a singular impact on the song. I started imagining, as I was working on the backing track: what kind of vocal melody would John Fogerty actually sing over this progression? I then wondered if Kris Myers from Umphrey's McGee (who is a magnificent vocalist in addition to being a devastating drummer) might be able to provide some Fogerty timbre to the melody. I asked him to sing the song with me and he was way into it.

On the album, you're hearing me and Kris singing the melody in octaves: me down below, and Kris bringing Fogerty zang to the upper octave. Then Bryan Beller and Joe Travers brought their effortless brilliance to the rhythm track.

The guitar solo section has a really challenging set of chords to play over, so I decided to write the solo out. It took a number of takes, attempted over several months on several guitars, but ultimately it was Jesse the good old green Clapton Strat that provided the right amount of twinkle and twang. It's a finger twister and it was very satisfying to finally nail it. On the last part of the solo I thought it would sound good to bring back an earlier take of the solo (played on the koa Charvel) and have both guitars playing in unison – it kicks the arrangement into a higher gear right there.

Kris also joined me on the backing vocals to great effect, and it was his idea to do the overlapping "come on" harmonies at the end – a really nice touch. Thank you Kris!

Oh and the title was unquestionably inspired by a game called Race The Sun, which Sarah was playing with some regularity at the time I was writing the lyrics. I'll grab inspiration from all possible sources.

O

Here's one that allows me to say, with all the truthfulness on this airplane, that this album has been in the works since the late '90s. The basic bed of this atmospheric track was made at Lyle Workman's studio, for one of the television documentary soundtracks I recorded back then.

"O" originally consisted of the weird noises at the beginning, the bang midway through, and the long synth drone throughout. The acoustic and electric guitars, and the piano at the end, were overdubbed in 2013 for Scambot 2, making this a collaboration between 36-year-old me and 51-year-old me.

Roll

The basic track for this song was recorded in Scott's living room, by Rick Musallam, Kris Myers and myself, the day after we finished rehearsals for Nearfest Apocalypse 2012. (The same session also gave us "Cram," which is on Inkling, and which features Rick Musallam on the far-right electric guitar, a fact inadvertently left out of the Inkling booklet.)

I wrote the main lick for "Roll" on the spot after we finished recording "Cram." My inspiration was Tony Iommi, and the reason for that was the dropped-D black SG I was playing. We started jamming on that lick, and then the rest of the pieces of the song emerged through the course of the jam, which I edited way down after the fact to arrive at the final song form. The slow 3/4 lick that runs through the chorus was something I came up with while we were jamming, and I realized on the spot it would make a good chorus, so then I started alternating the two licks. The bridge section in 5/4 ("No one leads a charmed life") was not played during the initial session – the drums in that section are from the original jam, but everything else was written later and superimposed onto the drums. Lots of editing and shuffling and overdubbing went on to arrive at this final form.

The tone of the main guitar is a combination of my Rivera Quiana mic'd up, plus a DI'd signal going straight to the computer where Mike Harris put it through a SansAmp plug-in. The end result is one of my favorite guitar tones I've ever gotten on record.

I originally overdubbed a synth bass track that mostly conveyed the vibe I wanted in terms of notes, but sonically it just wasn't bringing the rock the way it needed to be brought, so Beller came in and did what was required by the universe. The final piece of the cake, or the icing on the puzzle, as they say, was having Ben Thomas sing the verses in unison with me. We slammed both voices together in the center of the mix to make a new mutant double-voice. This song requires maximum playback volume.

Oh and there's a bunch of Hendrix-inspired slowed-down vocal stuff that shows up during the guitar solos. It just seemed like the right thing to do.

Constructed

Finally, my first country waltz! (Unless "Never Ever Wrong" counts. Maybe it does. OK, then, my second!)

The seed for this song was a voice memo I recorded on my phone called "Constructed," which consisted only of the words "Constructed, constructed. Constructed, constructed" (as sung at the 3:00 minute mark of the final song by three overdubbed Mikes in the far left corner of the mix, in a tone and attitude intended to evoke The Jordanaires). In the studio with Mike Harris, I used the rhythm of the words as a starting point for the piano part (the intro piano is playing the same "constructed, constructed" melody that shows up at 3:00). Having recorded that intro in the studio with Mike Harris, I continued on writing sections and recording them, until it got to the ending, when it seemed like the right time to bring back that "constructed" motif. Then I improvised the little Thom Yorke-inspired piano coda, and et voila! A song form.

That little snippet on my phone – just me singing "Constructed, constructed" – originally struck me as so funny for some weird reason. It seemed to me that "constructed" was such a mundane word, not really emotionally redolent of anything, and not at all suitable for use as the main hook of a song. But I started writing lyrics for the song, and with God, Bob, and Dog as my various witnesses, I tried really hard to come up with a concept and title that would be something other than "Constructed." But the lyrics inexorably wended their way towards that inflexible destination, and gradually I came to feel that the idea of "Constructed" as a song concept ended up really working.

Everyone involved in this song treated it with great delicacy and respect. Kris Myers' drum performance is really masterful – Mike Harris, who is a drummer himself, was freaking out over it while we were making the song. It was one of the performances that Kris recorded in Chicago in his single-day marathon drum session that yielded seven of his drum tracks. There are so many subtle rhythmic touches to his performance here, little hesitations and incremental groove shifts, which propel the song so beautifully. In the wrong hands this drum groove could really just sit there on the ground like a beech nut, but he gave it so much life.

Pete Griffin, who brings incredible heft and power to his electric bass playing on both Scambot 2 and Inkling, was good enough to haul his stand-up bass down from LA to Chatfield Manor for this song, and it could not have been more perfect – in my recollection, it was Pete who suggested that acoustic bass would work for the song. Man, I am so grateful for that insight and for this performance, beautifully recorded by Mr. Harris.

Jesse Keneally provided angel voices. They float around in the back of the choruses just audible enough to be felt – sometimes when I hear this song I wish we'd mixed them higher, but then other times I realize they lend just the right presence to the choruses – haunting, just beyond reach, chilling and lovely. I just want to hear more of them sometimes, 'cause she's my daughter you see.

You'll hear a couple of ghostly western guitar parts, meant to evoke pedal steel.

Before I worked out the final lyrics, I actually did an instrumental version of the song with a guitar playing the vocal melody all the way through – I thought that it might work, but although I was infatuated with it for a day or two, it didn't make me the feel the way this version does. I needed to hear the words "snowy train" in order to see the snowy train. (Some remnants of that melody guitar track do remain in the final mix however.)

Thanks for reading all this. I'll talk about the last four songs on Scambot 2 in the next Keneallist, and then get into Inkling a little later on once you've all had a chance to listen to it.

MK/BFD gigs in October

Also, hey: I'm bringing the trio version of Beer For Dolphins (me, Bryan Beller and Joe Travers) to Chicago and the Northeast in late October of this year. I was a bit stunned to realize that this particular configuration, with whom I gigged so much in California in the '90s, has never played in the Midwest and Northeast as a trio. There is a certain ferociousness that takes hold on when it's just me, Bryan and Joe, and it's going to be fun to finally bring that vibe to the other side of the country for once. We might tack on a few more shows in other locations in the U.S. if the stars align, but our window is small because of Bryan's and Joe's prior work obligations. I'm jazzed about being able to do even this many shows though. The very wonderful Travis Larson Band will be opening for us in the Northeast.

In Chicago we're playing at Progtoberfest II which will be hosting a wonderful slate of adventurous bands. The night before the BFD gig, I'll be guesting at a tribute to Keith Emerson, which is going to be a heavy emotional situation for me but I'm really looking forward to it. (I don't think I need to go into much detail here about how much Keith Emerson means to me. But, boy, he means a lot.) I know that Luis Nasser of Might Could and Sonus Umbra, and Jonathan Schang of District 97, are also taking part in the Chicago Emerson tribute, which is nifty – I like those guys a lot but this will be my first time playing with them.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2016 9:32 am 
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MIKE'S SCAMBOT 2 SONG DIARY, SIDE FOUR!

Ladies! Gentlemen! Cats!

I've been getting myself ready for the G4 Experience in Long Island next week. In addition to the classes I'm presenting, I'm playing shows with Joe Satriani, Keneally-Minnemann-Beller, and Steve Vai, so there's a lot to prepare. G4 is sold out, but there's a waitlist you can join in case anyone drops out, so here's the goldurn website.

Scambot 2 is now whirling around the globe to all who pre-ordered; thank you for doing that, those of you who did! The rest of you can now simply order it if you like, never mind the "pre." And for those who prefer the digital route, Scambot 2 is now officially available as a download (and, when ordered directly from the Keneally Store, the full digital booklet is included with purchase). Again as a reminder, the album Inkling is only available with the 2-CD physical edition of Scambot 2. I hope those of you who've received it are as enamored of the album design as I am. Kudos again to Atticus Wolrab - he did truly beautiful work on this album and I am grateful.

And now, I'll dither a bit about the final four songs on Scambot 2 – the eighteen-minute-and-four-second "side four" of the vinyl two-record set which does not yet exist but perhaps will some fine day...

Freezer Burn

The feeling of the beginning of this song was trapped in my head for months before I started recording it. If I knew anything about Scambot 2, I knew it was going to have one song that started with a vibe like a slow early-ish Pink Floyd track, replete with long held organ chords. Didn't know what any of the chords were yet, I just had this vibe in mind for a long time, and in fact I think it intimidated me for a while, enough that I avoided concretely starting the song for quite a while. Finally one day I was in the studio with Mike Harris and had gone as far as I could on the other stuff I had been working on, and he said "what's next?" I knew I couldn't put it off any longer. I decided on a working title (which, of course, stuck) and an opening chord, and made my way from there.

I had also had it in mind that the song was supposed to be seven minutes long, for some obscure numerological reason. On that first day of working on the song with Mike H., we laid down basic ideas for four sections totaling seven minutes.

I wasn't fully satisfied with the fourth section though – it was forced, something to achieve this basically arbitrary length. It was a fine feeling about a year later when I officially shaved off the final section (at one point I'd shaved off the third section [the ultra-spacey bit that starts at 4:17] as well, in a fit of overzealous pruning, until Sarah saw me listening to it in headphones and blissing out heavily and asked me "what the heck are you cutting that section out for? You obviously love it!").

There was also a lot of chatter in my head about whether or not this song should have lyrics. Scambot 2 is obviously a more lyric-oriented album than Scambot 1 was, and I had decided to let the lyrics be more explicit about driving and reflecting the plotline. So I tried a couple of times to begin work on "Freezer Burn" lyrics, and got nowhere with it. Finally one day I imagined a lead guitar in that opening section playing the role of a vocalist – something probably inspired by Satriani. To generate melody ideas I improvised three takes of lead guitar, then carved away until I arrived at a set of melodic statements I enjoyed – then learned those statements, and we recorded a new performance of them as the main lead guitar (you will still hear fragments of the original three improvised takes, dancing around the main guitar).

The second part is obviously Wooden Smoke-influenced, and I was real happy to get some of that flavor into Scambot 2. Part of that texture is due to none other than the much maligned 80s-era digital synth, the Yamaha DX-7. This poor box has been excoriated in the past, but it can really provide an interesting flavor, especially the fake jazz guitar setting which has a real nice pluck and sonorousness to it. (I also used quite a bit of distorted DX-7 on "In The Trees." You can make some really nasty industrial noise with it [just ask Trent Reznor], especially when you decide to pump it through your guitar pedalboard and go nuts.)

I give a special "yo!" to Jeff Berkley – I used his lap steel guitar as a major component of that ultra-spacey third part. I'd never played lap steel before, but it was a simple enough part that it didn't give me conniptions. There's definitely a major Steve Howe influence at play on this last section.


Scores of People

The title and opening lyrics of this song have been around since I was writing lyrics for The Mistakes in 1995, so when I claimed that Scambot 2 has been under construction since the late '90s, I guess I was technically mistaken. But for many years, the song consisted of nothing more than that title and those opening lyrics, and I believed for a long time that I would never go any further with them, that those few components comprised everything intelligent I could say on the subject of abuse of authority.

I did the music for the first part of this song (the lyric part) during the sessions for Scambot 1. I still only had the first few lyrics, but I wrote the music based on what I had, and presumed the rest would come eventually. I finally hit upon a set of lyrics that felt both germane to the plot and also managed to stand on their own. I think they work both as a sincere reflection of ideals I have and as a slightly parodic look at "cause"-oriented popular music.

The second part, the long piano-based instrumental, is a piece I wrote on Fender Rhodes when I was 16 years old. Gregg Bendian and Doug Lunn really shine on this section. I think there are three Bendian performances superimposed in this section; choosing things that he played and mixing them "just so" was seriously fun, completely my idea of a good time in the studio. The brilliance of Mike Harris also comes to the fore here. Hopefully all you headphone people are having a good time with this one.

Cold Hands Gnat

This was actually recorded before the version of "Cold Hands" that was on Scambot 1. I recorded this one at home, except for the acoustic piano which was later overdubbed at Scott's place. It was done as a songwriting demo, but it had a feeling about it that was so different from the version I did for Scambot 1, and I always had love for this version.

I think the gnat voice is endearing, but when Joe Satriani heard it he was terrified by it. You just never know how these things are going to hit people.


Proceed

The band track (me, Musallam, Beller, Travers) was recorded at Tom Trefethen's Remora Recorders studio in 2008 during the same sessions that produced the basic tracks for "Life's Too Small," "Cornbread Crumb," "Popes," "The Scorpions" and "Tiny Red Bug." It was a very productive couple of days. Trefethen (who engineered the early albums of Ambrosia that I love so much) is a pretty legendary figure with very deeply ingrained ideas about how to do things in the studio, and he surely knows how to create a specific vibe – for one thing, he designed his studio to look like a cave, with rough walls resembling rock, and he takes great pains to mic things up according to principles he's held dear since the '70s. We recorded the basic tracks to analog tape, and later brought them into the digital realm for overdubs. I can REALLY hear the benefits of analog recording on all these tracks, especially in the drum sound, which is insanely satisfying to my ears.

Lyrically this song was meant to invoke something of The Who's "Welcome" from Tommy, which was sort of an inside-joke reference to Scambot's status as a "concept album." But after a couple of attempts at writing the lyrics over a period of years, I finally realized exactly what this song should accompany in the story, and the lyrics emerged pretty effortlessly (with special thanks to Sarah for a couple of important suggestions that greatly improved matters).

The song intentionally leaves Scambot 2 on a note of anticipation – it works as a conclusion, I think, but also leaves one hanging slightly (that last chord isn't a resolving chord, exactly). That works for me in two senses: there will be a Scambot 3, so I didn't feel like I needed to wrap things up definitively at the end of Scambot 2; and there's a whole other album (Inkling) in the same physical package as SB2, and I think the end of "Proceed" segues very nicely into the beginning of "Presence" on Inkling.

More about which, soon!

Finally –

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2016 9:34 am 
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Mike's Bonus Diary, Pt 1

What would it be like if I said a few words about each track on Inkling, the second album which comes with the physical edition of Scambot 2?

I think... it might go... a little something... like... this:

Presence

This is a little scene-setting thing I recorded at home around 2008 or so. It was in fact meant to be the introduction to "Popes," a song that ended up on You Must Be This Tall. In fact after YMBTT came out and I found this track in my files (under the name "Popes Intro") I was a bit distraught that I hadn't included it on that album – but now I'm glad I waited. I think that opening chord, and the odd cascades of melody which follow it, work nicely as a welcome into the world of Inkling.

Scambot

It's kind of funny that this song isn't on the main album. It was a starting point for the entire series and was under consideration for both Scambot 1 and 2. I love Marco's drumming on it, and the sound of the SG on the solo. Lyrically the song is a reminder to myself to meditate – maybe that's why it didn't end up as part of either of the key Scambot releases, because the message is so personal that it kept acting like a roadblock to the fictional narrative. I'm certainly very happy about its placement now. Everything on Inkling feels to me like it's exactly where it's supposed to be.

Boghe

The synth tracks for the main body of the song were recorded for Court TV in the late '90s at Lyle Workman's studio, and the acoustic guitars, and everything in the coda, were done years later at Scott's. In its original unadorned form, it very nearly was the opening track on Wine And Pickles. When I sent an early version of the Wine And Pickles running order to my friend, composer/producer/radio presenter Co de Kloet, he said that "Boghe" sounded to him more like one of his own ambient compositions than anything particularly Keneally-ish. It is unusually spacious for me, and I think might provide some indication of what Scambot 3 might eventually sound like. The coda of "Boghe" is one of my favorite little bits of music I've ever written. It fades languidly away until...

Sickness

...barges in like a plastic pineapple to the head. The basic track for this was acoustic guitar (me) and acoustic bass (Bryan), recorded in 2006 for a Keneally/Beller acoustic album that we decided not to complete (it was mainly to be duo versions of previously released tracks, plus four new songs: "Hallmark," "DaDunDa," "Land" and "Sickness"). Once I realized that this one didn't need to remain a duo piece, I allowed myself to run rampant with the overdubs. There's a lot of crazy, noisy stuff on this track, but my favorite section is the contemplative bit starting at 0:39. The first bass note that heralds the new section makes me more happy than is reasonable. And the three clean electric guitars that play the harmonized melodies in this section sound like dreams come true to me.

The Coma

"Sickness"/"The Coma" were going to be a set-piece on Scambot 1, but the plotline never made room for them, so I didn't bother finishing them at the time (if I had they would have ended up on the bonus album Songs And Stories Inspired By Scambot 1). The basic track for "The Coma" went like this: me writing the main rhythmic motif on my Charvel guitar, and showing it to Marco, and then me conducting the ensuing composition by jumping up and down and contorting my body while playing variations of the main motif, and Marco orchestrating my spasms in real time. That was recorded in 2006, and I spent a good part of the next nine years on and off with Mike Harris ladling gallons of guitar and other overdubs onto it, then painstakingly tweaking the proportions. I have so many mixes of this in my laptop it could practically be its own album.

I Named You

This little kitten was very nearly going to be the second song on Scambot 2, as a major left turn after "In The Trees." Evan's flute sounds great, and coming as it now does after "The Coma," it is a major left turn, and it also nicely ushers in "Chunk 2" of Inkling (check out the back cover of the Inkling booklet to see how I think these pieces group together in four chunks. Maybe four sides of a ten-inch pair of 45-rpm discs?).

Falafel

Don't know why I called it "Falafel," other than I think it's a cool looking word. This was actually the original ending of "In The Trees," before it became clear that "In The Trees" was more effective at a trim, concise 10:28. "Falafel" is a return to the groove heard behind the guitar solo at 3:30 of "In The Trees," but taken at a slower pace for a heavier grind. It's a good jolt of adrenaline for Inkling.

O Elastic Love!

Another synth soundtrack excerpt from the Court TV recordings, heavily modified with guitars. The twisty guitar riff that comes in at 0:19 shows up again on the piece "O" from Scambot 2. I like how much ground "O Elastic Love!" covers in such a short span of time, and the piano solo at the end is one of the most personally satisfying keyboard solos I've ever played.

Cram

More than any other song that didn't make it onto Scambot 2, taking this one off kind of broke my heart a little. I really, really, really like "Cram." It's based on the same guitar tuning I used for the song "Weekend" (D A C F# B E, an open D13 chord), specifically because I wanted to be able to go directly from "Weekend" into another song (or the other way around) during a gig without having to switch guitars. The day after the Keneally Band rehearsal for NEARfest 2012, only Kris Myers, Rick Musallam and I remained at Chatfield Manor, enough people to get "Cram" (and "Roll") off the ground. The initial "Cram" jam lasted well over half an hour. The groove on this thing is supremely exhilarating to me. I've spent hours blissing out listening to rough instrumental versions of it. When I sent an early version to Kris Myers, he declared it to be cramtastic.

There are so many things I dig about it: Ben and Jesse's vocals, the synth bass, the absolutely insane and masterful Kris Myers drum performance, and the interplay between my and Rick's guitars. (And I may have mentioned before that Rick's name was accidentally left off the credits of this song? One of the things I will do in the future, believe you me, is to write an essay specifically about all the wonderful things Rick plays in this song. Until that time, strap on your headphones [make sure you've got them on the right way] and pay special attention to all the little Les Paul chatterings on the right side of the mix. Beautiful.)

Well that's half the album and it feels like a good spot to take a breather. I'll come at you soon with words about the second half of Inkling. Y'all are freaking sweet people. Have some green beans, man, they're good for you.
Lozenge,
Mike

PS. We just added a couple of Baked Potato gigs to the end of the Mike Keneally & Beer For Dolphins tour in October/November (see keneally.com for tour dates). They're on Sunday November 6 and Tuesday November 8 – the second of which is Election Day in the US. I think we'll all be in the mood for a blowout gig that night. On Sunday it'll be the Keneally-Beller-Travers trio, but on Tuesday it'll be Keneally-Musallam-Beller-Travers as we gleefully welcome Rick Musallam back into our ranks.

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 25, 2016 9:42 am 
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Scambot 2 and Inkling are great! They've been in steady rotation since the pre-order free download became available. My signed copy is #212/2000. I love all of his albums, but my favorite might me Sluggo!. Wooden Smoke is another favorite. If I could only pick three for deserted island listening, they would be Sluggo!, Boil That Dust Speck and hat..


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