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PostPosted: Fri Apr 26, 2013 5:48 pm 
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Burning midnight oil does not keep people from falling asleep, as far as I know. Midnight oil is just regular oil that is being consumed due to late working hours. Burning the midnight oil means working late, somehow...someone said it once and it just took. I wonder who.


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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 6:14 am 
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Thanks.

What about "Playing for Keeps"?

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 6:24 am 
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Playing for keeps means that you are very serious about whatever is being undertaken. It is often used in competitive sports analysis or in romantic relationships. A sports player who is "playing for keeps" is very determined to win. A person in a romantic relationship that is "playing for keeps" is interested in a more long term commitment rather than just having a fling.

"Listen, you know I love you, but I just can't take this,
You know I love you, but I'm playing for keeps,
Although I need you, I'm not gonna make this,
You know I want to, but I'm in too deep."

In Too Deep by Genesis

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 6:42 am 
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Thanks, duchamp! Very educative... 8)

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 5:15 pm 
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Way way back a long time ago, when we were children, we used to play marbles, If you were playing for keeps and you won you got to keep your opponents marbles...

Marbles are glass, clay, steel or agate balls usually about ½ inch (1.25 cm) across. However, they may range from less than ¼ inch (0.635 cm) to over 3 inches (7.75 cm), while some art glass marbles for display purposes are over 12 inches (30 cm) wide. Marbles are often collected, both for nostalgia and for their aesthetic appeal.

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 6:07 pm 
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I think Green Machine knows what marbles are :roll:


BTW: To lose one's marbles is to go crazy. This may have been a forgotten Ozzy Osbourne lyric: "I'm losing all my marbles on the Crazy Train"

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Wow there's hardly anything fun to do since they made music illegal

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 6:26 pm 
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Milton Bradley wrote:
I think Green Machine knows what marbles are :roll:


BTW: To lose one's marbles is to go crazy. This may have been a forgotten Ozzy Osbourne lyric: "I'm losing all my marbles on the Crazy Train"


And there are many others as well. Here are some from The Trial by Pink Floyd:

Crazy toys in the attic I am crazy
Truly gone fishing
They must have taken my marbles away

Crazy over the rainbow I am crazy
Bars in the window

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PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 8:06 pm 
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Just being pacific :wink:


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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 5:18 am 
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Did I ax you? :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 6:04 am 
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duchamp wrote:
Milton Bradley wrote:
I think Green Machine knows what marbles are :roll:


BTW: To lose one's marbles is to go crazy. This may have been a forgotten Ozzy Osbourne lyric: "I'm losing all my marbles on the Crazy Train"


And there are many others as well. Here are some from The Trial by Pink Floyd:

Crazy toys in the attic I am crazy
Truly gone fishing
They must have taken my marbles away

Crazy over the rainbow I am crazy
Bars in the window


Wait a minute! Aerosmith were talking about being crazy, and there were no actual toys in the attic? For shame Tyler!

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PostPosted: Wed May 08, 2013 6:09 am 
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calvin2hikers wrote:
duchamp wrote:
Milton Bradley wrote:
I think Green Machine knows what marbles are :roll:


BTW: To lose one's marbles is to go crazy. This may have been a forgotten Ozzy Osbourne lyric: "I'm losing all my marbles on the Crazy Train"


And there are many others as well. Here are some from The Trial by Pink Floyd:

Crazy toys in the attic I am crazy
Truly gone fishing
They must have taken my marbles away

Crazy over the rainbow I am crazy
Bars in the window


Wait a minute! Aerosmith were talking about being crazy, and there were no actual toys in the attic? For shame Tyler!


I apologize for shattering yet another illusion of integrity.

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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 2:36 am 
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Is overnite sensation the sensation of being w/o sleep overnight or a sudden trend or when an artist becomes famous overnight?

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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 2:45 am 
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Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
Is overnite sensation the sensation of being w/o sleep overnight or a sudden trend or when an artist becomes famous overnight?


Famous overnight......an instant hit, from zero to hero in the blink of an eye. like Trendy


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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 11:35 am 
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You may ask yourself "Whats an Oakie"


From Agency Man

Quote:
We'll sell him in the movies
On the tube throughout the year
We'll sell him by the buckets
To the Okies drinking beer




According to Wikipedia:

Quote:
Okie is a term dating from as early as 1907,[1] originally denoting a resident or native of Oklahoma. It is derived from the name of the state, similar to Texan or Tex for someone from Texas, or Arkie or Arkansawyer for a native of Arkansas.

In the 1930s in California, the term (often used in contempt) came to refer to very poor immigrants from Oklahoma (and nearby states). Jobs were very scarce in the 1930s, but after the defense boom began in 1940, there were plenty of high-paying jobs in the shipyards and defense factories.

The "Okie" migration of the 1930s brought in over a million newly displaced people; many headed to the farms in California's Central Valley

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PostPosted: Thu May 16, 2013 11:59 am 
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Milton Bradley wrote:
You may ask yourself "Whats an Oakie"


From Agency Man

Quote:
We'll sell him in the movies
On the tube throughout the year
We'll sell him by the buckets
To the Okies drinking beer




According to Wikipedia:

Quote:
Okie is a term dating from as early as 1907,[1] originally denoting a resident or native of Oklahoma. It is derived from the name of the state, similar to Texan or Tex for someone from Texas, or Arkie or Arkansawyer for a native of Arkansas.

In the 1930s in California, the term (often used in contempt) came to refer to very poor immigrants from Oklahoma (and nearby states). Jobs were very scarce in the 1930s, but after the defense boom began in 1940, there were plenty of high-paying jobs in the shipyards and defense factories.

The "Okie" migration of the 1930s brought in over a million newly displaced people; many headed to the farms in California's Central Valley

Okie from Muskogee Originally meant a loser from Muskogee, Oklahoma. Okie is slang for a person from Oklahoma. Muskogee is a small, rural city in the middle of east bumble fuck Oklahoma.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eoiJSDgoDjQ

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PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 8:43 am 
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I already heard of the indian of the group, now what is an indian summer, as in someone's indian summer? Thanks in advance.

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PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 9:21 am 
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Warm temps in the autumn. Cue the Doors.
Quote:
Wiki sez:

An Indian summer is a period of unseasonably warm, dry weather, occurring after the end of summer proper. The US National Weather Service defines this as weather conditions that are sunny and clear with temperatures above 21 °C (70 °F), following a sharp frost. It is normally associated with late-September to mid-November.[1]

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PostPosted: Thu May 30, 2013 10:58 am 
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So it is no special particular metaphor for a person being in its Indian summer, right?

Flight of fancy?

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 1:25 pm 
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On the news today, I heard Attorney General Eric Holder use the phrase "out of whack" and thought that might be a good phrase for this thread. Especially since there is no phrase "in whack" as that hasn't been used for centuries. When something is not working properly it is out of whack.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 1:33 pm 
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That one has never made sense. When we look at the definitions of "whack", it still does not make sense.

http://www.onelook.com/?w=whack&ls=a













Indian summer is great, but watch out for white man's winter.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 1:48 pm 
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Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
I already heard of the indian of the group, now what is an indian summer, as in someone's indian summer? Thanks in advance.


Indian Summer occurs after summer proper has ended, usually after the first frost. The weather becomes unseasonably warm, hazy and humid, usually lasting for a few days. A beautiful time of the year in the Northeastern US.

For an artist, it seems to refer to a period when they are past their prime and then make a final comeback, maybe not quite as fiery but still worthwhile and notable. For example, I frequently read about conductor Bruno Walter's Indian Summer when he made his last period of recordings with the Columbia Symphony Orchestra in the late 50's - early 60's, while in his 80's. Many of these recordings are considered to be among his finest.

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 3:54 pm 
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The Forum Killed Arkay wrote:
On the news today, I heard Attorney General Eric Holder use the phrase "out of whack" and thought that might be a good phrase for this thread. Especially since there is no phrase "in whack" as that hasn't been used for centuries. When something is not working properly it is out of whack.



According to the "Word Detective":

“Whack” as a verb first appeared in the early 18th century meaning “to beat or strike sharply and vigorously,” and was probably formed in imitation of the sound such a blow would make. As a noun, “whack” started out meaning just such a blow, but soon developed a range of secondary meanings. One of the odder uses was “whack” meaning “a portion, one’s share,” originally slang in the criminal underworld meaning “a share of the proceeds of a crime.” Just how this sense developed is uncertain, but it may have been coined as a play on the “splitting” of the loot. This “fair share” sense then went on to mean “an agreement” (“‘I’ll stay if you will.’ ‘Good — that’s a whack’,” Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer), and, in the 19th century, “in fine whack” and similar phrases appeared meaning “in good order” or, of a person, “in good shape.”

By 1885, the opposite sense had predictably appeared, and a person (or body part) in bad shape was described as “out of whack” (“His liver is out of whack and no mistake,” 1918). Almost immediately the phrase was also applied to mechanical devices (“Being able to get at any part of the mechanism which may be ‘out of whack’ is important,” 1906), which is the most common sense in use today.



:smoke:


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 06, 2013 4:00 pm 
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sleeping in a jar wrote:
Mr_Green_Genes wrote:
I already heard of the indian of the group, now what is an indian summer, as in someone's indian summer? Thanks in advance.


Indian Summer occurs after summer proper has ended, usually after the first frost. The weather becomes unseasonably warm, hazy and humid, usually lasting for a few days. A beautiful time of the year in the Northeastern US.

For an artist, it seems to refer to a period when they are past their prime and then make a final comeback, maybe not quite as fiery but still worthwhile and notable. For example, I frequently read about conductor Bruno Walter's Indian Summer when he made his last period of recordings with the Columbia Symphony Orchestra in the late 50's - early 60's, while in his 80's. Many of these recordings are considered to be among his finest.



jars rendering sounds good, here is more on Indian Summer in general that all may find interesting:

there are several theories about the origin of “Indian summer,” but none considered the final word. The first occurrence of the phrase in print found so far is from a book written in 1778 by a French-American farmer, James Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur, describing late autumn in New York’s Hudson Valley: “… [the first snow] is often preceded by a short interval of smoke and mildness, called the Indian Summer.”

Several theories focus on that reference to smoke (which also occurs in other citations from the 18th and 19th centuries) explaining “Indian summer” as being the time when Indians were in the habit of setting fires to drive game out of hiding as part of one last big hunt before the arrival of the snow. Another theory ties the smoke to fires set by the Indians to clear fields for the next spring’s planting. It’s also said that Indians took advantage of that period of mild weather to move to their winter hunting grounds.

Some other explanations of the phrase are rooted in the less than idyllic relationship between European settlers and the Indians. One citation from 1824 explains that “The smokey time commenced and lasted for a considerable number of days. This was the Indian summer, because it afforded the Indians another opportunity of visiting the settlements with their destructive warfare.” The “Indian” in “Indian summer” may also be a derogatory use of “Indian” to mean “false or unreliable,” as found in the slur “Indian giver.”

Perhaps it’s better just to go with the explanation offered by the Indians themselves, recounted by a Boston clergyman in 1812: “This charming season is called the Indian Summer, a name which is derived from the natives, who believe that it is caused by a wind, which comes immediately from the court of their great and benevolent God Cautantowwit, or the south-western God.”


:smoke:


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 2:06 pm 
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Jumped the shark?

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2013 2:20 pm 
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Jump the Shark is from the tv show Happy Days. The Fonz water ski'd over a shark. It was a stunt to drive ratings, but it was so silly that it was cited as the point at which the show started to spiral downward. Anything that has reached a point of spiraling downward has jumped the shark.

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A question I have is The Who - Athena

Athena, my heart felt like a shattered glass in an acid bath
It felt like one of those flattened ants you find on a crazy path
I'd have topped myself to give her time she didn't need to ask
Was I a suicidal psychopath?
She's just a girl - she's a bomb


I've heard "topped myself" in the UK means to masturbate. Is that true and relevant to the song? He whacked off so that he wouldn't need sex all without being asked to do so? I suppose it doesn't really need to make sense...

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